bug off


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bug off

slang Get out of here; go away; get lost. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just bug off and leave me alone!
See also: bug, off
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bug off

 
1. Sl. to cease bothering [someone]. Hey, bug off! Your comments are annoying. I wish you would bug off!
2. Sl. Get out!; Go away! (Usually Bug off!) Bug off! Get out of my sight! Bug off and leave me alone!
See also: bug, off
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bug off

Also, bugger off. Go away, as in Bug off before I call the police. Both terms are often used as an imperative, as in the example, and the variant is heard more in Britain than in America. [Slang; c. 1900] For a synonym, see buzz off.
See also: bug, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bug ˈoff!

(American English, spoken) a rude way of telling somebody to go away
See also: bug
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bug off

v. Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command: Bug off! I'm trying to get some work done.
See also: bug, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bug off!

exclam. Get out!; Go away! Bug off! Get out of here!
See also: bug
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

bug/bugger off

Leave, get out of here. The American usage is mainly the first, the British the second. Both are slang and rude, especially given another meaning of “bugger” (sodomize), and both have been in use since at least 1900. James Joyce wrote, “Here, bugger off, Harry. There’s the cops” (Ulysses, 1922).
See also: bug, bugger, off
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
It fluttered up to where the light is and plucked a bug off the wall.
The CEO finally told her to bug off. She thinks I caused her a problem!"
An exasperated Kilmer, 36, who finished the relationship in June, said: "I just can't get Cindy to bug off.
I should have pulled my Volkswagen Bug off the road, but I compromised and buckled my seat belt instead.
With the remote control switch, he or she can sit at a listening post and switch the bug off when there is any sign that it may be in jeopardy or when it is not needed.
He also wasn't happy that Heather flicked a bug off the instructor's chest.
Megan, a law student at Teesside University, runs up to five times a week and caught the bug off her parents.
Whenever a question comes up that is a little too tough, the committee has a standard reply, "The Committee will consider this issue and advise you of its decision in the near future." This is double-speak which means, "Bug off."
Altus Brands is to the rescue with their new Bug Off Hat.
Time someone in the Government told RBS that sorry chums, it's NOT your dosh to lend, so tell those Yankies to bug off and look elsewhere for their filthy lucre.
Page, the managers of Autumn Woods Apartments (formerly Upland Gardens), and the Worcester Housing Court are finding that getting bed bugs to bug off is a complicated campaign that resolves only in surviving the battle, not winning it.