bud

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best bud

A very good or best friend. Carly's been my best bud for years—I can tell her anything.
See also: bud

bud head

One who often drinks beer. I was a real bud head back in college, but now I enjoy wine more.
See also: bud, head

bud out

Of a plant, to produce buds (which blossom into leaves or flowers). I'm so relieved to see that flower budding out—I thought I had killed it!
See also: bud, out

bud scale

The hard, protective layer surrounding the buds of some plants. Oh, that's just a bud scale—your plant is fine.
See also: bud, scale

bud up

1. Of a plant, to produce buds (which blossom into leaves or flowers). I love springtime, when flowers finally start budding up again.
2. To come suddenly into existence. Feelings of resentment began budding up inside of me. Vegan restaurants have been budding up all over town recently.
See also: bud, up

in (the) bud

In an undeveloped, immature, or incipient state. Tommy has become quite a little painter in bud recently. The young dramatist's style led one reviewer to liken him to an Ibsen in the bud.
See also: bud

nip (something) in the bud

To stop, cease, or prevent something at the beginning or early phase, before it becomes too difficult or unmanageable. I've noticed that Tommy's getting in the bad habit of chewing with is mouth open. Let's nip that in the bud. Why don't you nip the issue in the bud before it starts affecting the entire user base?
See also: bud, nip

sense bud

slang High-quality marijuana that does not contain seeds. "Sense" is actually a variant spelling of the slang term "sinse," a shortening of the Spanish word sinsemilla, meaning "without seed(s)." You only find skunk weed in that part of the country, so it's nice to be back here smoking some good sense bud.
See also: bud, sense

sinse

slang High-quality marijuana that does not contain seeds. A shortening of the Spanish word sinsemilla, meaning "without seed(s)." You only find skunk weed in that part of the country, so it's nice to be back here smoking some good sinse.

the darling buds of May

The flowers of early spring. The phrase comes from Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 ("rough winds do shake the darling buds of May"). I'm so sick of winter that I just can't wait for the darling buds of May to be in bloom.
See also: bud, darling, may, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bud out

[for a flowering plant or tree] to develop buds. How early in the spring do the trees bud out around here? The trees bud out in early spring.
See also: bud, out

nip something in the bud

Fig. to put an end to something before it develops into something larger. (Alludes to destroying a flower bud before it blooms.) I wanted to nip that little romance in the bud. The whole idea was nipped in the bud.
See also: bud, nip
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nip in the bud

Halt something at an early stage, or thoroughly check something. For example, By arresting all the leaders, they nipped the rebellion in the bud. This metaphoric expression, alluding to a spring frost that kills flower buds, was first recorded in a Beaumont and Fletcher play of 1606-1607.
See also: bud, nip
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nip something in the bud

COMMON
1. If you nip a bad situation or bad behaviour in the bud, you stop it at an early stage. It is important to recognize jealousy as soon as possible and to nip it in the bud before it gets out of hand.
2. If you nip something good in the bud, you stop it before it can develop. The higher prices would fuel inflation and nip the consumer recovery in the bud. Note: This expression may refer to extremely cold weather damaging a plant and stopping it flowering. Alternatively, it may refer to a gardener pruning a plant in bud to prevent it flowering.
See also: bud, nip, something
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

nip something in the bud

suppress or destroy something at an early stage.
This phrase refers to the horticultural practice of pinching out plant buds to prevent the development of shoots or flowers. Nip in this sense was used figuratively in the late 16th century, and nip in the bud in the early 17th century.
See also: bud, nip, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

nip something in the ˈbud

stop something in its early stages because you think it is dangerous to let it develop: This problem needs to be nipped in the bud before it is too late.I think that the government’s new proposal should be quickly nipped in the bud. OPPOSITE: let something ride
See also: bud, nip, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

best bud

n. a best buddy; a best friend. Isn’t Bill your best bud? Why are you so mad at him?
See also: bud

bud

(bəd)
n. a Budweiser beer; any beer. (see also budhead.) How ’bout one of them buds in a green bottle?

sinse

and sense (bud) (sɪnts and ˈsɛnts (bəd))
n. seedless marijuana. (Drugs. From Spanish sinsemilla, “seedless.”) Where’s the sinse I was saving? Tom only gets high on sense bud.

sense bud

verb
See sinse
See also: bud, sense
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

nip in the bud, to

To stop something before it can develop further. This analogy to an early spring frost that kills off flower buds dates from the sixteenth century. Sir Boyle Roche (1743–1807), a member of Parliament, was quoted in this memorable mixed metaphor: “Mr. Speaker, I smell a rat; I see him forming in the air and darkening the sky; but I’ll nip him in the bud.”
See also: nip, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Below, a fantastic view by night of the outside of the hall; Maud Budder's poem; Assize judges as they go Beneath the massive portico Are heart to mutter: ``Bless my wig, This Hall is really rather big!''
Hirst's Bushman was a nation budder, and has provided inspiration to the conservative side of politics in Australia.
As early as 1990, systems engineer Marty Overbleck-Bloem, an ex-employee of Lockheed Missile and Space Company, budder of billion dollar NRO satellites, blew the whistle on the NRO.
"It's a late budder, " he noted, " so there is less of a problem with frost damage.
Marijuana include sinsemilla and concentrated resins which are stronger form of marijiuana containing high doses of marijuana'EUR (TM)s active elements which includes honeylike hash oil, waxy budder, and hard amberlike shatter.
In Colorado, ArcView's report found traditional flower sales were down by roughly 56 percent while sales of concentrates like dabs, budder and cannabis oils quadrupled in 2016, accounting for more than $80 million, or 22 percent worth of sales, a far cry from the more than 13 percent of the market concentrates accounted for back in 2014 when Colorado first went completely legal.
Violations of subcategorial properties are observable for budder "that which buds, or is in bud" (onomasiological mark = unaccusative verb), so-soish (Keats), ourishness, Sir-Thomas-Brown-ness, and out-of-the-way-ness (Coleridge).