bubblehead


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

bubblehead

1. A foolish, dumb, or ditzy person. I can't believe I said something so stupid—what a bubblehead.
2. One who often drinks champagne. Susan's a real bubblehead, so order her a glass of the finest champagne.

bubblehead

1. n. a fool; a giddy person. If you can’t say anything without coming off like a bubblehead, keep your mouth shut.
2. n. a heavy drinker of champagne. It takes a pretty good bankroll to be a real high-class bubblehead.
References in periodicals archive ?
The underlying question in Uglies and Pretties-is the bubblehead operation so bad if it means no war, hatred, or environmental destruction?--is given center stage, with no neat solution at the end.
IN THE MARCH 4 New Yorker, Aaron Sorkin, executive producer of NBC'S The West Wing, referred to President Bush as a "bubblehead." The ensuing flap found commentators across the political spectrum cast in familiar roles: liberals deriding conservatives as dumb, ignorant boors and conservatives deriding liberals as egg-headed, arrogant elitists.
Mencken about the "guru letters"--fawning missives he had addressed to "Beloved Master" Roerich in happier days-- Wallace weaseled, causing intense mirth among the press corps, who unaffectionately referred to him as Old Bubblehead. Objective scrutiny of the man and his record makes Westbrook Peglers of us all.
I knew she couldn't be the bubblehead the mainstream media make her out to be (otherwise, why would she do the same thing to my gaydar that Jodie Foster and Tatum O'Neal did?).
"My sweet lamb, precious bubblehead," she whispered in my ear.
Stepping briskly out of copyright, the debutante writer returns to her native soil--this time, one hopes, not as a suicide or a Bloomsbury bubblehead with no social conscience, but as a writer.
More unexpected, however, is the swiftness with which Margulies and Silverstone dignify Mandy and distinguish her from the usual bubblehead stereotype.
He and his oddly-named pals, Bubblehead and Loops, switched their attention to the Second City last weekend after exhausting the network beneath London.
Find the community of revolutionaries called the New Smoke and stop the influx of pills that cure the city-mandated 'bubblehead' operation, allowing pretties to think for themselves.
(Some of us have long since wearied of the 1960s up-yours attitude that drenched Fosse's work.) And then there's her sharply informed performance as a Roaring Twenties homicidal bubblehead. She has become an even more brilliant Broadway artist today than she was twenty years ago, and can now orbit in that stratosphere of stardom attained by such Broadway legends as Merman, Martin, and Channing.
I'm not sure what accounts for the Hitchensonian nostalgia for the man my father called "Old Bubblehead." Does anyone care to remember Ike's record on the right of African-Americans to equal education?
Admittedly, any show that begins with a conversation between a sorority bubblehead and a yapping Chihuahua has this critic at curtain-up.
The underlying question in Uglies and Pretties--is the bubblehead operation so bad if it means no war, hatred, or environmental destruction?--is given center stage, with no neat solution at the end.
Reduced to its essentials, the premise of Broadcast News--a good-looking bubblehead and a serious reporter vie for the affections of a workaholic producer --sounds like a formulaic answer to a request for a love story with a TV news background.