brute

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brute force

Strong physical force, perhaps that which is exercised without thought or consideration. I couldn't get my car out of the mud until my brothers came along and moved it by brute force. You can't just fix everything with brute force. Sometimes you need to use some finesse.
See also: brute, force

by brute strength

By sheer force or physical strength. I couldn't get my car out of the mud until my brothers came along and moved it by brute strength.
See also: brute, by, strength

et tu, Brute?

A phrase used to express one's dismay at mistreatment or betrayal. The phrase is attributed to Julius Caesar, whose close friend Brutus conspired to murder him. The Latin phrase translates to, "And you, Brutus?" Wow, even you're voting against me, Sarah—my own sister? Et tu, Brute?
See also: ET

by brute strength

by great muscular strength. The men moved the heavy door by brute strength.
See also: brute, by, strength

brute force

Also, brute strength. Savage violence, unreasoning strength, as in We hope that reason will triumph over brute force. Although this expression is also used literally to mean exceptional physical power, the figurative sense reflects the origin for brute, which comes from Latin brutus, for "heavy, stupid, unreasoning." [First half of 1700s]
See also: brute, force

brute force

Savage, senseless violence; also, sheer strength. The word “brute” came from the Latin brutus, which meant heavy, stupid, and unreasoning. The original meaning survives more in this cliché, dating from the eighteenth century, than in the modern English noun “brute,” which means simply an animal or a cruel person. Brute force is strength applied without thought as, for example, in forcing a lock. Eric Partridge’s compilation of catchphrases records one spelling this out: “brute force and ignorance,” current in Great Britain in the 1970s.
See also: brute, force

et tu, Brute!

You, my so-called friend, are also betraying me. This expression is generally credited to Shakespeare, who used the exact Latin locution (literally, “and you, Brutus”) in Julius Caesar (3.1) in 1599. However, Shakespeare actually was loosely quoting the real Julius Caesar, who reportedly said, “You too, my child?” when Marcus Brutus stabbed him in 44 b.c. Caesar made this dying remark in Greek (according to Suetonius’s account). Incidentally, “Brute” did not signify “brute” in the sense of animal; it simply is the proper Latin case for this name. A more recent version, with friends like that/you, who needs enemies, became current in America in the 1960s. It usually is a response to a far less dire betrayal—a tactless remark by a friend, for example.
See also: ET

et tu, Brute?

(pronounced “Bru-TAY”) An expression of feeling betrayed. Marcus Brutus was one of the conspirators against Julius Caesar, formerly his great friend. Shakespeare's drama has Caesar's dying words the Latin for “and you, Brutus?” meaning “and you too” and uttered with tragic resignation as the Roman emperor recognized Brutus as one of his assassins.
See also: ET
References in periodicals archive ?
These people are more worthy of the name "brute" than the weak defenceless animals they crucify.
He said that Kashmir had been a disputed territory but Indian wanted to continue her unlawful occupation there through brute force, shamelessly.
Frankel is a monster, a brute o fahorse regularly pounding lesser opposition intosubmission.
The one problem with this, you see, is that history does not think kindly of these brutes.
The DVD allows new and existing customers for the first time to see all the advantages that the full range of Big Brutes can offer.
After the War the Brutes returned to Australia with their two sons and settled in Traralgon for most of the 1920s.
Though the odious brutes seem over the top, fans will enjoy Norah Hess' latest tale.
He has to maintain that toughness--even be tougher--with all the spoiled millionaire brutes he commands.
"The show stereotypes the Italo-American family in the worst way....Besides the whole crime element, it shows Italo-Americans as uneducated, low-life brutes."
The Brute adapter from Drum Runner features an exclusive grasping mechanism that holds Brutes securely to prevent spillage of contents during lifting, transporting and pouring.
"The brutes must be ruled brutally and by brutes," stated a 1930 British report on the Pashtuns.
Some observers hypothesize that she had been indoctrinated to believe the malicious stereotype of the Ursidae as awkward, clumsy, ill-mannered brutes. In any case, this flaxen-haired vixen perpetrated a "B and E," a felony punishable by law.
"I think the poet depicts homosexual practices as the revolting invention of predatory brutes in order to maintain a reassuring boundary between licit and illicit and to remove from the courtly ideal of erotic artifice any taint of the stigma of effeminacy that usually was associated with heterosexual intercourse indulged in with no intention of procreation, but only for mutual delight" (8).
Whether or not Mercer is guilty, there are undoubtedly women who remain with violent men, not out of simple fear but because they actually want to stay with these brutes. Ulrika Johnson springs to mind.