brush aside

(redirected from brush them aside)

brush aside

1. To move someone or something out of one's path. A noun can be used between "brush" and "aside" or after "aside." The man brushed us aside so that he could board the bus. I brushed aside the curtain and entered the room.
2. To casually, unexpectedly, or brusquely dismiss or ignore someone or something. A noun can be used between "brush" and "aside" or after "aside." I know they're young, but you can't just brush their questions aside—they deserve answers. I haven't heard back from that company, so I guess they're brushing aside my complaint.
See also: aside, brush

brush someone or something aside

 
1. Lit. to push or shove someone or something out of the way. Don't just brush me aside. I almost fell over. I brushed aside the branch, not realizing it was poison ivy.
2. Fig. to cast someone or something away; to rid oneself of someone or something; to ignore or dismiss someone or something. You must not brush this matter aside. The clerk brushed aside the old man and moved on to the next person in line.
See also: aside, brush

brush aside

Disregard, ignore, as in The teacher brushed aside our questions.
See also: aside, brush

brush aside

v.
1. To push or wave something or someone out of the way: I brushed aside the clutter and put my books on the desk. The police brushed the people aside to make way for the president.
2. To refuse to listen to someone or something; ignore someone or something: I continued to complain, but they brushed aside my protests. Whenever people try to bother me at a party, I just brush them aside.
See also: aside, brush
References in classic literature ?
He was inclined even to brush them aside, to consider them more as an incident in his career.
Even amid a slew of top-tier economic data, markets may be forced to brush them aside as geopolitical fears take the center stage,' Metrobank Research explained.
But make no mistake: The Scotland team have done their country proud - because they never gave up, even against opponents who were expected to brush them aside.
For instance, while acknowledging that CEOs rely on mass forms of communicating with employees, such as town hall meetings, site visits, voice mail, blogs and the like, they brush them aside as too "formal and public," and incapable of fostering trust with larger audiences.
They invented the thoroughbred after all, and we would be unwise to brush them aside lightly.