bring to light

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bring to light

To reveal something, often something inappropriate or illegal. The revealed information can be stated between "bring" and "to" or after "light." Discrepancies in the yearly budget report brought to light corruption in the company. I never wanted to be a whistleblower, but I'm the only one who can bring these documents to light.
See also: bring, light

bring someone or something to light

Fig. to present or reveal someone or something to the public. The newspaper story brought the problem to light. I have brought some interesting facts to light in my article.
See also: bring, light

bring something to light

Fig. to make something known. The scientists brought their findings to light. We must bring this new evidence to light.
See also: bring, light

bring to light

Reveal or disclose something previously hidden or secret, as in After careful investigation all the facts of the case were brought to light. This term uses light in the sense of "public knowledge." [First half of 1500s]
See also: bring, light

bring something to ˈlight

show information, evidence, etc: The police investigation brought to light evidence of more than one crime.These documents have brought new information to light about Shakespeare’s early life.
See also: bring, light, something

bring to light

To reveal or disclose: brought the real facts to light.
See also: bring, light
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ministry of Defence was today considering launching an appeal after being condemned by an employment tribunal for tolerating a culture of sexism brought to light by a female RAF pilot.
The box in question was the now notorious James ossuary, a bone casket recently brought to light and on exhibit at the Royal Ontario Museum.
They are incredibly bright, set off against a background of shadowy foliage disappearing into blackness--suggesting that the blooms are illuminated or, as I like to think of them, brought to light. The wallpaper comparison is by no means a swipe, but rather speaks to Steinkamp's long-running preoccupation with the use of moving images in architecture, and her unabashed impulse to decorate space.
A similar case was brought to light in July of 2001 with the arrest of Dimitry Skiyarov during the Las Vegas Defcon Hackers convention, after giving a speech about his company's software that was designed to bypass the protection codes installed on Adobe Systems Ebooks.
She said that the spate of scandals involving corporate malfeasance and financial mismanagement brought to light at Enron Corp.
The September 11 attacks brought to light "the nature of the U.S.
The finding was brought to light in UK Sport's quarterly anti-doping report out today.
Wolfenden cared little about his own peccadilloes being brought to light, but, in an ironic twist of fate, his father, Jack Wolfenden, was at that time crafting the Wolfenden Report, which was to affect the civil liberties of all British homosexuals.
The model provided considerable insight into the digester operation that would not be brought to light without its use.
The recent revelations about his possible homosexuality are examined and other surprising facts are also brought to light, such as him having a number of Jewish friends in his youth.
Originally classified as top secret, its exact location was uncovered and brought to light by the Berne newspaper Bund in 1992.
First, the background checks have brought to light the whereabouts of 10 people with outstanding arrest warrants, including one being sought for a federal offense.
Nevertheless, Castro's moratorium and the papal visit brought to light significant fragments of a religious faith that, if not really comprising an underground, had been living in quiet repose.
Brazilian dance is much more than just Carnival's feathered and sequined samba, however, and the 1996 biennial brought to light all its richness and variety.
Some of these artists and their works have only recently been brought to light. In many cases, new scholarship has attributed pieces to women artists that have long been listed as "old masters" work.