bring (something) to bear

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bring (something) to bear

1. To use pressure or force to cause a certain result. If you want a confession from that guy, you're going to have to bring pressure to bear on him.
2. To point or aim a weapon. I brought the gun to bear on the intruder and was able to scare him off.
See also: bear, bring

bring to bear

Exert, apply, as in All his efforts are brought to bear on the new problem, or The union is bringing pressure to bear on management. [Late 1600s]
See also: bear, bring

bring something to bear (on something)

1 aim (a weapon) (at something). 2 muster and use something to effect (on something).
See also: bear, bring, something

bring to bear

1. To exert; apply: bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
2. To put (something) to good use: "All of one's faculties are brought to bear in an effort to become fully incorporated into the landscape" (Barry Lopez).
See also: bear, bring
References in periodicals archive ?
* While considerable pressure is being brought to bear on the industry to move towards a recycling model, care must be taken to ensure that any new economic model ensures a better future for the entire industry, including, in particular, the natural rubber producers if the diversity of materials is to be maintained.
The new study is "the most impressive arsenal of dating techniques to be brought to bear on this subject so far," says geologist Gifford H.
Disease management means organizing and documenting not just direct hands-on care, but all the other resources - staffing, equipment, patient education - brought to bear on that care.
Alternately, evil could be traced to its root cause, the one thing that makes it possible no matter what outside forces are brought to bear: individual choice.
There was considerable discussion in the steering committee that no preconceived notions or undue influence be brought to bear on the selected firm.
Skram, who was married and divorced twice, decried the double standard brought to bear on women and deplored the sexual ignorance of most women before marriage.
However, when policy starts being "turfed aside in individual little battles, because of pressure brought to bear," there is no longer any security.
Friends of the Irish Environment has called for the "full weight of the law" to be brought to bear after the Co Cork sites were ruined.
But now pressure must be brought to bear for the futuristic technology to still win support.
But would these advantages be enough against the overwhelming numerical superiority brought to bear by the Great King?
Consulting firms such as the HNTB Companies provide these services to many transportation agencies across the country and have experts who can be brought to bear on such projects.
It is typical that the full weight of the law was brought to bear on this unfortunate woman, while the police and the courts are incapable of lifting a finger when vandals are breaking the law.
The fall-out of the sexual revolution has brought to bear some ugly realities.
Yet before life-expectancies at birth could break through the barriers which prevented them from going much beyond the age of 45 or 50 (where they were at around 1910), other technologies and mind-sets also had to be brought to bear. Many of these new techniques had wonderfully benign effects on new-born infants and young children, leading to massive reductions in infant mortality.
Also, in this post-Enron era, there's a growing need for more dynamic directors who can help chart a company's course amid market changes, and greater attention is being brought to bear on having directors carry out their roles in a more independent way, said Mike Magsig, senior client partner for Korn/Ferry International's Financial Services Market and co-leader of the firm's insurance search practice.