bring (someone) into the world

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bring (someone) into the world

1. To give birth to a baby. It's a big responsibility to bring a baby into the world.
2. To assist the birth of a baby. Dr. Brown is a fine obstetrician—she brought all three of my kids into the world.
See also: bring, world

bring someone into the world

Fig. to deliver a baby; to attend the birth of someone. The doctor who brought me into the world died last week. I was brought into the world by a kindly old doctor.
See also: bring, world

bring into the world

Also, bring forth. Give birth, as in It's certainly easier to bring a child into the world when you have a definite means of support , or "Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and bring forth a son" (Matthew 1:23). Both versions of this term have a somewhat archaic ring. [First half of 1400s]
See also: bring, world
References in periodicals archive ?
Beneteau also claims that "a period of physical recovery is necessary before another child is brought into the world" to justify the use of NFP.
If I had my way we would forget Santa and concentrate on the joy and hope which was brought into the world by the birth of Jesus, our saviour, not on how many presents we can get out of Father Christmas.
First brought into the world as Contemporary Administrator, the magazine is born in the basement of a skilled nursing facility in Birmingham, Ala.
When are they going to realise that the only way to learn about parenting is to spend more than a few hours a week in the company of the child they have brought into the world?
Conceived in the mid-1930s, brought into the world in the 1940s and to fruition in the 1950s, Negritude was the child of the last decades of French imperialism and its assimilationist doctrine.
"If he can't be bothered to turn up to see his first child being brought into the world, then that says something about his priorities in life."
The massive brood was brought into the world by stunned County Durham vet Jacqui Molyneux, who owns the Prince Bishop Veterinary Hospital in Leadgate, Consett.
NFP values the natural rhythms of a woman's reproductive cycle, and understands that a period of physical and emotional recovery is necessary before another child is brought into the world. This time period varies from mother to mother.