bring down

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bring down

1. Literally, to bring something from a high or elevated position to a lower point. If you're going upstairs, can you bring down another dish towel for me? They won't bring down the volume when I ask nicely, so I'm calling the cops!
2. To make one sad or in a worse mood. In this usage, a pronoun is typically used between "bring" and "down." I don't feel like going out tonight—learning that I didn't get the job really brought me down.
3. To cause the failure or defeat of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can used between "bring" and "down." The stock market crash really brought down my small business. When people stopped having a disposable income, they were reluctant to buy my cute crafts. The rebels are determined to bring down the government. Embezzlement charges were enough to bring down the corrupt CEO.
4. To decrease the cost or expense of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can used between "bring" and "down." I won't buy the house unless they bring down the price—I don't want my mortgage payment to be quite that high.
5. To cause an object or structure to collapse or fall apart. They think that a compromised foundation is what ultimately brought down the old house. Three people sitting on the chair at the same time brought it down in pieces.
See also: bring, down

bring someone down

 
1. Lit. to assist or accompany someone from a higher place to a lower place. Please bring your friends down so I can meet them. She brought down her cousin, who had been taking a nap upstairs. Aunt Mattie was brought down for supper.
2. Fig. to bring someone to a place for a visit. Let's bring Tom and Terri down for a visit this weekend. We brought down Tom just last month. They were brought down at our expense for a weekend visit.
3. Fig. to restore someone to a normal mood or attitude. (After a period of elation or, perhaps, drug use.) The bad news brought me down quickly. I was afraid that the sudden change of plans would bring down the entire group.
See also: bring, down

bring something down

 
1. Lit. to move something from a higher place to a lower place. Bring that box down, please. And while you're up there, please bring down the box marked "winter clothing."
2. to lower something, such as prices, profits, taxes, etc. The governor pledged to bring taxes down. I hope they bring down taxes.
3. Fig. to defeat or overcome something, such as an enemy, a government, etc. The events of the last week will probably bring the government down. The scandal will bring down the government, I hope.
See also: bring, down

bring down

1. Cause to fall, collapse, or die. For example, The pilot won a medal for bringing down enemy aircraft, or The bill's defeat was sure to bring down the party. [c. 1300]
2. Cause a punishment or judgment, as in The bomb threats brought down the public's wrath on the terrorists [Mid-1600s]
3. Reduce, lower, as in I won't buy it till they bring down the price, or He refused to bring himself down to their level. This usage may be literal, as in the first example, or figurative, as in the second. [First half of 1500s]
See also: bring, down

bring down

v.
1. To move something or someone from a higher to a lower position: He brought down the plates from the top shelf. She brought the trunk down from the attic.
2. To cause something to fall or collapse: The explosives went off and brought down the old building. That tower is so strong that no wind could bring it down.
3. To reduce the amount or level of something: I opened the window to bring down the temperature in my room. Can you bring the volume of the stereo down a bit?
4. To remove a ruler or government from a position of power: The rebels intend to bring down the government. A strong opposition to the leaders could bring them down. The president was brought down by the scandal.
5. Slang To depress or discourage someone: The argument I had with my friends really brought me down.
See also: bring, down
References in periodicals archive ?
Gale force winds and heavy rain prevented the vehicle from being brought down to Llanberis yesterday.
Huge gusts, which also brought down a 40ft tree onto flats in Smethwick and sent a scaffolding tower crashing to the ground in Birmingham city centre, severely disrupted train journeys today.
The last group among the 1,050 tourists was brought down the 2,956-meter Mt.
It was the moral corruption of communism, not the might of the United States, which ultimately brought down the USSR.
James could have been dismissed when he brought down Thierry Henry in injury time, but was still annoyed Silvestre had been allowed to remain on the pitch.
He consulted with student leaders in China during the 1989 Tiananmen Square uprising, and his book was used as a blueprint by the Serbian opposition movement Otpor that brought down Slobodan Milosevic in October 2000.
We can grow from it as easily as be brought down by it.
But intelligent use of the Internet can lead to cost reductions: UD, he says, has brought down recruiting costs per student from $473 in 1996, to $390 in 2001.
More travel havoc came to the West Coast Mainline between Birmingham and London yesterday after a train brought down power lines.
But Boa Morte was brought down in the 83rd minute and with regular penalty taker Louis Saha off injured, the new Portuguese cap converted.
Good people can be brought down by bad organizations and good organizations can be brought down by bad people.
Summary: New Delhi [India], June 30 (ANI): Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on Friday informed that the Goods and Services Tax (GST) on fertilizers has been brought down from 12 percent to five percent.
Womankind is brought down when we don't stick together.
A bomb that brought down Russian Metrojet Flight 9268 in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula last month was placed in the aircraft's main cabin, the daily Kommersant said Wednesday, citing an unnamed source, according to (http://www.
Hull broke the deadlock when Matty Start smashed his effort past Adam Lawlor in the Emley goal and the visitors doubled their lead when Jamie Richardson was brought down in the area by Alex Slack and Brett Agnew netted the penalty.