broom

(redirected from broomy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to broomy: Brummy

a new broom sweeps clean

proverb A new manager (of a company or organization) will be able to bring a fresh perspective and energy necessary to making beneficial changes and improvements. After two years of falling profits, the company needed to make big budget cuts and drastically improve its corporate culture, so a whole new upper management team was brought on board. A new broom sweeps clean, after all. A: "I'm hoping Jill will make some big changes to how things operate now that she's been promoted to General Manager." B: "She's already been talking about all the things she wants to improve, and a new broom sweeps clean."
See also: broom, clean, new, sweep

all mops and brooms

Drunk. Likely a reference to the mops and brooms needed to clean up after drunk people who vomit. I can't stand coming to this bar—it's full of college kids who are all mops and brooms for the first time. I got all mops and brooms at the party last night, and I'm paying for it today, all right. I may never drink again!
See also: all, and, broom, mop

broom closet

The figurative place where one hides one's practice of Wicca or other Pagan religious beliefs or activities from other people, likened to a homosexual person being "in the closet" when they have not publicly revealed their sexual orientation. "Broom" is a reference to the stereotypical accessory of witches. I had been studying the intricacies of real witchcraft for several years before I came out of the broom closet to my parents.
See also: broom, closet

broom up

1. To clean something up using a broom; to sweep something up. A noun or pronoun can be used between "broom" and "up." I was excited about my internship with a local barber, until I realized that all I'd be doing was brooming hair up all day. My father didn't say a word as he broomed up the broken glass left over from the attack on his shop.
2. dated Of a piece of wood, to become split and frayed, like the end of a broom. The storm left the jib boom pretty badly broomed up.
See also: broom, up

jump the broom

1. To jump from one side of a broom to the other with one's new spouse. A custom that originates in various European heritages, it is now a widespread tradition in African-American communities. The phrase can also be written as "jump (over) the broomstick." It's important to me that we both jump the broom during our ceremony. Jumping over the broomstick symbolizes the sweeping away of one's past life and the start of a new one with your spouse.
2. By extension, to get married. It seemed like Thomas wasn't ever going to jump the broom, but I suppose it's never too late to find love. Martin and Mary will be jumping the broom next summer.
See also: broom, jump

new broom

A new manager (of a company or organization) who has been hired specifically to make changes and improvements. After two years of falling profits, a new broom was hired to make budget cuts and improve the corporate culture.
See also: broom, new
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

New brooms sweep clean.

 and A new broom sweeps clean.
Prov. Someone who is new in a particular job will do a very good job at first, to prove how competent he or she is. Jill: That new supervisor is awfully strict. Jane: New brooms sweep clean. The new teacher immediately flunked three of the laziest students. "A new broom sweeps clean," one of the students shrugged.
See also: broom, clean, new, sweep
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

new broom sweeps clean, a

A fresh leader or administration gets rid of the old and brings in new ideas and personnel. For example, Once he takes office, you can be sure the President will replace most of the people on the staff-a new broom sweeps clean . This term was already in John Heywood's 1546 proverb collection, was used figuratively by Shakespeare, and exists in many other languages as well.
See also: broom, new, sweep
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a new broom

You can call someone a new broom when they have just started a new job in a senior position and are expected to make a lot of changes. We had a new, exceptionally young headmaster and he was a very active new broom. We need a new broom for the project to have credibility Note: You can use new-broom before a noun. If everyone is in the habit of arriving ten minutes late, a new-broom manager will have a struggle to change the habit. Note: You can also use the proverb a new broom sweeps clean. A new broom doesn't always sweep clean, it just brushes some of the worst dirt under the carpet for a while. Compare with make a clean sweep.
See also: broom, new
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a new broom

a newly appointed person who is likely to make far-reaching changes.
This phrase comes from the proverb a new broom sweeps clean .
See also: broom, new
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a new ˈbroom (sweeps clean)

(British English, saying) a person who has just started to work for an organization, a department, etc., especially in a senior job, and who is likely to make a lot of changes: The new managing director is clearly a new broom. He’s already got rid of ten members of staff and now he’s looking at our working methods.
See also: broom, new
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
A rolling road closure will take place along Broomy Hill Road between January 24 and the end of June, starting at the junction with Tilmouth Park Road and moving northwards towards 53 Broomy Hill Road.
The six-month scheme will provide protection for 13 properties on Broomy Hill Road that have flooded in times of extremely heavy rainfall.
A rolling road closure will move along Broomy Hill Road between January 24 and the end of June.
Texel x pounds 59 Greenland; pounds 57.50 Broomy Hill; pounds 56.50 Anick; pounds 54.10 Paradise; pounds 54 Colepike; pounds 52.50 Stable Yard; pounds 52 New Dotland; pounds 51 Nunwick; pounds 50 Waite Farm, Halton Red House & Rawfoot; pounds 49.50 (x2) Brokenheugh; pounds 48.80 Baal Hill & High Eshells 114.2p Brokenheugh; 112.1p High Eshells; 110.3p Low Mill; 109.5p Quarry House; 109.1p Stable Yard; 108.2p Brokenheugh; 107.8p North Cocklake; 107.6p High Warden; 107.5p (x2) Blakelaw; 107.4p Old Bridge End; 107.3p Camphill; 107.1p Lingey Field; 106.5p Tedcastle; 106.3p Warkshaugh; 106.1p Brokenheugh & Paradise
Mule 59.20 Broomy Hill; pounds 54.20 & pounds 52 New Dotland; pounds 50.20 Anick; pounds 50 New Dotland; pounds 49 Harwood Shield; pounds 47.80 Springwell; pounds 47.10 Peacock House; pounds 47 New Dotland; pounds 46.80 Camphill; pounds 45.90 Carraw; pounds 45.20 Blakelaw; pounds 45 Baal Hill & New Dotland (x2)
For more information contact Broomy Hill Road housing office on 0191 277 7940.
pounds 63.20 Lingey Field; pounds 60 Broomy Hill & Comb Hill; pounds 57.20 Colepike; pounds 56.80 Butsfield Burn & The Reenes; pounds 56.50 West Morralee; pounds 56 Low Fotherley, Thornton Tower & Farnham Park; pounds 55.80 Airy Holm; pounds 55.50 Cowburn Rigg.
pounds 61.50 & pounds 60.20 Morrowfield; pounds 60 Broomy Hill; pounds 57.80 Whins; pounds 57.20 Lingey Field; pounds 57 Cowburn Rigg; pounds 55.80 Palm Strothers; pounds 55.50 Greenland & Colepike; pounds 55.20 Nunwick & West Shields.
A breath test showed Forrester, of Broomy Hill Road, Throckley, had 88mgs of alcohol in 100mls of breath.
pounds 56 West Kirkheaton, pounds 54.50 East Town, pounds 54.20 Breckon Hill (S.S) & Ochrelands, pounds 53 Low Eshells & Broomy Hill, pounds 52 Little Swinburne, pounds 51.20 Prospect Hill, pounds 51 Hotbank, pounds 50.80 West Morralee, pounds 50 Lingey Field & Todburn, pounds 49.50 Low Ardley, pounds 49.20 Bensons Fell, pounds 49 Low Eshells & Fir Tree
Rosewood Villa Residential Home, on Broomy Hill Road, Throckley, Newcastle, is hosting the event tomorrow from 10am until 2pm, and all are welcome.
The man, a plumber, whom police are not identifying, was pounced on from behind in Broomy Hill Road, Throckley, Newcastle, on Friday night.
Two Year Old Gelding or Filly: 1, Mr and Mrs W and J Moran, Dewsberry Park; 2, Mr and Mrs W and J Moran, Arlington Park; 3, J McLain, Broomy Wallace; 4, Mrs J Agnew, Joli Certain.
The sale topped at pounds 42 for Texel cross sheep from Broomy Hill Farm with fit but not fat Mule ewes experiencing the biggest lift in trade.
Texel x pounds 35.50 Greenland, pounds 32.20 Nunwick, pounds 25.20 New Dotland Mule pounds 33.50 Nunwick, pounds 33 Buteland & Greenland, pounds 32.80 Berwick Hill, pounds 30 Broomy Hill, pounds 29 East Matfen, pounds 27.20 Old Town & New Dotland, pounds 27 Walltown, pounds 26.50 East Matfen, pounds 26.20 Buteland & Stotsfold, pounds 24.80 Low Staples, pounds 23 Humber Hill, pounds 22 Blakelaw & Nunwick.