brood

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brood over

To worry anxiously or be despondent about something or someone, especially at great length and in isolation. I know you're upset about failing your exam, but don't brood over it all weekend. Tom's been brooding over our financial situation ever since he got laid off last month.
See also: brood, over

brood about (someone or something)

To worry, fret, or obsess over someone or something. Quit brooding about that fight you had with your girlfriend and just talk to her already! Recent financial losses have the boss brooding about the future of our small company.
See also: brood

brood about someone or something

 and brood on someone or something; brood over someone or something
to fret or be depressed about someone or something. Please don't brood about Albert. He is no good for you. There's no need to brood on Jeff. He can take care of himself.
See also: brood
References in periodicals archive ?
However, its hard to build a well-rounded collection of data on the species since each brood only emerges once every 13 or 17 years, he said.
While some physiological characters correlate with the morphological characters (Guler, 1999), others such as brood cycle, are genetically determined (Louveaux, 1973; Strange et al.
We determined the parentage of 276 nestlings from a total of 77 broods produced both before and after the experiments started (43 broods from the reciprocal experiment, 23 from the all-supplemented treatment, and 11 from the communal feeders treatment).
The latter criterion limits us to using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011 to estimate the proportion of females or pairs having second broods.
Synchronized generations of three Magicicada species designated as Brood II reliably emerge every 17 years in a swath of the U.
Grouse clutch and chick survival (proportion of hens with broods and mean brood size), in plot years with predator control, were significantly greater (1.
Cicada researchers are using observations from citizen scientists, along with automated devices equipped with GPS, to make more accurate records of Brood II's emergence than any cicada invasion before.
The presence of Brood XIX in Indiana brings the number of established periodical cicada broods in the state to five (Kritsky 2004).
In previous years, the researchers found correlations between stress hormone levels, the number of offspring in a brood, and the amount of weight nestlings gained.
In general, results indicate that parasites may strongly affect reproduction of female mosquitofish by reducing the number of embryos in developing broods.
Three times this year the parents tirelessly raised broods of brothers and sisters only to see them brutally murdered within days of leaving the nest.
Last year two broods of barn owl youngsters died at John Wilson's Whitelee farm near Byrness, north of Otterburn.
The Northumberland farm lost two broods of barn owl youngsters last year after suspected poisoning.