break ground

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break ground

To start a construction project. The phrase refers to the first excavation of the site, often done with a ceremonial shovel. They broke ground on the new corporate headquarters today, but it will be years before we can actually move into it.
See also: break, ground

break ground (for something)

to start digging the foundation for a building. The president of the company came to break ground for the new building. This was the third building this year for which this company has broken ground. When do they expect to break ground at the new site?
See also: break, ground

break ground

Also, break new ground.
1. Begin digging into the earth for new construction of some kind. For example, When will they break ground for the town hall? This usage alludes to breaking up the land with a plow. [Early 1700s]
2. Take the first steps for a new venture; advance beyond previous achievements. For example, Jeff is breaking new ground in intellectual property law. [Early 1700s]
See also: break, ground

break ground

AMERICAN
1. If someone breaks ground on a new building, they start building it and if a new building breaks ground, it starts to be built. Simpson and Hurt hope to break ground on a planned outdoor theater next August. The first co-housing project in America will break ground soon.
2. If someone breaks ground in a particular activity or area of study, they do something that is different and if something breaks ground, it is different from what came before. Perhaps I am lucky to have been in there at the start, when this music was breaking ground for the first time. We are breaking ground in the law here and have to proceed cautiously.
See also: break, ground

break ground

1. To begin a new construction project.
2. To advance beyond previous achievements.
See also: break, ground

break ground, to

To begin a new project; to be innovative. The term dates from the sixteenth century, when it meant literally to break up land with a plow, and began to be used figuratively by the late seventeenth century, by the poet John Dryden and others. In 1830, when De Quincey described Jeremy Bentham as “one of those who first broke ground as a pioneer . . . in Natural Philosophy,” the expression was well on its way to clichédom.
See also: break
References in periodicals archive ?
s Indianapolis Foundry broke ground on a new 42,000 sq ft cleaning dept.
Seventy years after we broke ground on the first building on this campus, Brooklyn College takes enormous pleasure in acknowledging the participation of so many individuals whose efforts have made this day possible.
Caption: The Community Preservation Corporation of New Jersey broke ground with the residential developers and Paterson city officials to celebrate the start of the renovation of 19 Market Street (formerly known as the Cooke Administration Building) in Paterson, N.
The city and Parks & Recreation Department and the Department of Environmental Protection recently broke ground on the renovation of St.
Westminster Communities broke ground last fall on the project, which ultimately will include 750 luxury residences.