britches


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get too big for (one's) britches

To become overconfident in one's importance, skill, or authority; to start speaking or behaving as if one is more important or influential than one actually is. He's gotten too big for his britches ever since he got that promotion. Honestly, John got too big for his britches as soon as pro teams started scouting him.
See also: big, britches, get

too big for (one's) britches

Overconfident in one's importance, skill, or authority; behaving as if one is more important or influential than one actually is. He's gotten too big for his britches ever since he got that promotion. John's been too big for his britches now that he's been scouted by pro teams.
See also: big, britches

too big for (one's) own britches

Overconfident in one's importance, skill, or authority; behaving as if one is more important or influential than one actually is. She's gotten too big for her own britches ever since she got that promotion. John's been acting too big for his own britches now that he's been scouted by pro teams.
See also: big, britches, own

wear the britches

To be in charge in or control of a relationship or family. The phrase is typically applied to a woman, contrasting the fact that pants were historically only worn by men, who were traditionally the decision makers. Often followed by "in the family" or "in the house." I think it's pretty obvious who wears the britches in that family—Grandma Helene. Actually, in our relationship, we both wear the britches—we make decisions together.
See also: britches, wear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

too big for one's britches

Rur. too haughty for one's status or age. Bill's getting a little too big for his britches, and somebody's going to straighten him out. You're too big for your britches, young man! You had better be more respectful.
See also: big, britches

wear the britches (in the family)

 and wear the pants (in the family)
Rur. to be in charge in the family. Jane bosses her husband around something scandalous. It's clear that she wears the britches in the family. I don't intend to let my wife wear the pants in the family. Mary's a strong-minded woman, but her husband still wears the britches.
See also: britches, wear
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

too big for one's britches

Also, too big for one's boots. Conceited, self-important, as in Ever since he won that tournament he's gotten too big for his britches, or There's no talking to Jill anymore-she's just too big for her boots. This metaphoric idiom alludes to becoming so "swollen" with conceit that one's pants or boots no longer fit. [Late 1800s]
See also: big, britches
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

too big for your boots

BRITISH, INFORMAL or

too big for your britches

mainly AUSTRALIAN, INFORMAL
If someone is too big for their boots, they behave as if they are more important or clever than they really are. Note: In the second expression, `britches' is also spelled `breeches'. I was often accused of being too big for my boots. If you ask me, he's too big for his britches since he struck it rich. Note: You can also say that someone gets too big for their boots or gets too big for their britches. In Britain, people seem to have a thing about not letting someone get too big for their boots. Getting too big for their britches, kids these days. Think the whole universe should revolve round them. Note: Britches are trousers which reach as far as your knees.
See also: big, boot
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

too big for your boots

conceited. informal
See also: big, boot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

too ˌbig for your ˈboots

(informal) thinking that you are more important than you really are: His political rivals had decided that he was getting too big for his boots.
See also: big, boot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

too big for (one's) britches

Overconfident; cocky.
See also: big, britches
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

too big for one's britches (breeches)

Conceited, self-important. This expression, alluding to becoming so swelled with self-importance as to burst out of one’s clothes, sounds ancient but dates only from about 1900, as does the closely related too big for one’s boots. The latter appeared in Sir Henry Maxwell’s Life of W. H. Smith (1894): “Sometimes a young man, ‘too big for his boots,’ would sniff at being put in charge of a railway bookstall.” And H. G. Wells (Kipp, The Story of a Simple Soul, 1905) wrote, “He’s getting too big for ’is britches.”
See also: big, britches
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The performance pieces of Split Britches have surely helped to spark many a feminist theorist's essays on lesbian identity, gender subversion and the space of performance.
The new CD is a mixture of originals (some exhibiting her strong eco-friendly stance) and traditional material like Leather Britches and Satan, Yer Kingdom Must Come Down which could almost be a reference to Young's anti-corporate musical stance.
Both appear in leading roles in ITV1's version of the Boris Pasternak novel Dr Zhivago - while Bonneville also turns up in the Beeb's latest britches and bosoms epic Daniel Deronda - George Eliot's final novel.
With such a rapid rise, some may fear Myleene, right, and her band members will get too big for their britches - but judging by the bizarre trousers Kym sported, the problem is quite the opposite.
As life evolved priorities somewhat changed as grandchildren also referred to as "little people" or "little britches" entered his retired life.
Underground legend: Jimi Britches, Richard Massie, and Jordan Tabayoyon
Fit Britches pants (from PS34.99) are made from a heat-generating material that increases blood flow and stimulates fat breakdown.
Because we can't get enough of lords and butlers, britches and bonnets, ballrooms and sculleries.
After all, beards and britches are very much in at the moment thanks to movies like Cold Mountain and the camp cowboy hit Broke back Mountain, although I only watched that because my mum asked me to rent it from the local Blockbuster.
Snapped up by Paul Howling to replace Patrick Mathers on 66-1 chance T iger Hunter - the other two `riderless' horses had to be withdrawn - she borrowed an old pair of Pat Eddery's britches, plus a saddle, helmet and whip from Paul Doe, and rode a race either would have been proud of, getting the gelding home by a length from Goldhill P rince.
This Enchant dress, pounds 45, has a spell for True Love and can be worn with or without Witches Britches, pounds 35, available on-line at www.spellwear.com
``She's a right old bossy britches,'' says stud owner Mrs Anne Roberts, ``b ut she keeps the youngsters out of trouble, loves them all and,in spite of her old age,keeps her pride.''
And the floppy-haired designer was in heaven last night as he got to dress up in britches and a flouncy shirt to present the show.
ASSASSIN'S CREED IV: BLACK FLAG (18+) Xbox 360, PS3, PC, Out now Climb into the britches of Assassin's Creed IV's suave swashbuckler Edward Kenway, plundering the ports and plantations of the 18th century Caribbean, playing the game like your own personal Master and Commander sim.
They were members of London's first student long-form improv troupe (Streets of Rage) and collectively have worked with live art legends such as Bobby Baker, Split Britches' Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver and have composed music for the Royal Shakespeare Company.