bring (something) to bear

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bring (something) to bear

1. To use pressure or force to cause a certain result. If you want a confession from that guy, you're going to have to bring pressure to bear on him.
2. To point or aim a weapon. I brought the gun to bear on the intruder and was able to scare him off.
See also: bear, bring
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bring to bear

Exert, apply, as in All his efforts are brought to bear on the new problem, or The union is bringing pressure to bear on management. [Late 1600s]
See also: bear, bring
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bring something to bear (on something)

1 aim (a weapon) (at something). 2 muster and use something to effect (on something).
See also: bear, bring, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bring to bear

1. To exert; apply: bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
2. To put (something) to good use: "All of one's faculties are brought to bear in an effort to become fully incorporated into the landscape" (Barry Lopez).
See also: bear, bring
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And Mull the painter brings to bear the same earnest irreverence, seriousness of intent, and dark humor.
Me refusez vous donques une place?" In the attempt to understand the reasons why this question was formulated in these precise terms and in so urgent a manner, Defaux meditates, in the course of the book, on the various senses of the word "place" and brings to bear other documents, both classical and Christian: the marginal notations in Montaigne's copy of Lucretius' De rerum natura recently published by M.
In fact, this may or may not be the case; but Defaux brings to bear his formidable rhetorical skills and draws upon the recent work of numerous Montaigne scholars (Michel Simonin, Alain Legros, M.A.
Kerrigan brings to bear his learning in the literature of the seventeenth century, especially Donne and Milton, on what seems like a familiar topic.
In summary, this work deserved to be published and will certainly be useful, since it includes many words not defined in any other lexicon, and its author brings to bear an impressive knowledge of humanistic Latin and Renaissance culture.