bring (one) to book

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bring (one) to book

To confront or question one about one's wrongdoings, often as a precursor to punishment. That's it—the next time I see Rachel, I'm bringing her to book! I simply can't tolerate her selfish behavior any longer. I'm sure the boss is going to bring me to book for my outburst during the meeting. I just hope I don't get fired.
See also: book, bring

bring to book

Call to account, investigate. For example, He was acquitted, but one day soon he'll be brought to book, or As for your records, the IRS is sure to bring you to book concerning your tax deductions. This term uses book in the sense of "a written record," such as an account book or ledger. [c. 1800]
See also: book, bring

bring someone to book

bring someone to justice; punish someone.
See also: book, bring, someone

bring somebody to ˈbook (for something)

(formal, especially British English) make somebody explain their actions, or punish them: This is just another of the many crimes for which nobody was ever brought to book.
See also: book, bring, somebody

bring to book

To demand an explanation from; call to account.
See also: book, bring
References in classic literature ?
In waiting, too, like an attendant summer breeze, a fluttering young damsel, all pink and ribbons, blushing as if she had been married instead of Bella, and yet asserting the triumph of her sex over both John and Pa, in an exulting and exalted flurry: as who should say, 'This is what you must all come to, gentlemen, when we choose to bring you to book.