bring (someone or something) back to life

(redirected from bring us back to life)

bring (someone or something) back to life

1. Literally, to reanimate a person or animal that has died. The patient did die on the table, but we were able to use the defibrillator to bring her back to life. Unfortunately, the dog's injuries were so severe that the doctor could not bring him back to life.
2. By extension, to energize someone. A: "OK, schedule Tuesday's meeting, get John on the phone, and then come in my office so we can all discuss that big project." B: "Wow, that cup of coffee really brought you back to life!"
3. To revitalize something that has become dull or stale. The new CEO's creative approach really brought that failing company back to life.
See also: back, bring, life

bring someone (or an animal) back to life

 and bring someone (or an animal) back
to make someone or some living creature come back to life. There was nothing that would bring Jimmy's cat back. It was truly dead. Not even a magician could bring back the cat.
See also: back, bring, life

bring something back to life

Fig. to restore vitality to something, such as a performance, a story, etc. (See also bring someone or an animal back to life.) The third act of the play had a clever twist that brought the whole drama back to life.
See also: back, bring, life
References in periodicals archive ?
After the short December days and the wet of January, the longer days and colder conditions bring us back to life.
But they will not be able to bring us back to life.
The food - I had an avocado, tomato and mozzarella salad, FLY followed by a chilli-infused spaghetti dish and hubby had king prawns and a calzone pizza - was terrific, and offered portion sizes big enough to bring us back to life after our marathon day.
The food - I had an avocado, tomato and mozzarella salad, followed by a chilli-infused spaghetti dish and hubby had king prawns and a calzone pizza - was terrific, and offered portion sizes big enough to bring us back to life after our marathon market day.
Amid some merciless debunking of the culture industry, Dollimore's desanitization of literature recovers the attractions of sexual disgust and inhumane fantasies while recognizing the dialectical complexities of desire, which 'can wreck us and bring us back to life and maybe both at once' (p.