bring somebody to book

bring (one) to book

To confront or question one about one's wrongdoings, often as a precursor to punishment. That's it—the next time I see Rachel, I'm bringing her to book! I simply can't tolerate her selfish behavior any longer. I'm sure the boss is going to bring me to book for my outburst during the meeting. I just hope I don't get fired.
See also: book, bring

bring somebody to ˈbook (for something)

(formal, especially British English) make somebody explain their actions, or punish them: This is just another of the many crimes for which nobody was ever brought to book.
See also: book, bring, somebody
References in periodicals archive ?
No doubt that is because of the natural anxiety, if not the pressure, on those investigating the offence to bring somebody to book for it.
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