bring (someone or oneself) to (do something)

(redirected from bring oneself to)

bring (someone or oneself) to (do something)

1. To cause or inspire one to take a particular action. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used after "bring." A desire to help my community brought me to volunteer at the local soup kitchen. Your mother and I just cannot fathom what would bring you to disrespect us like that.
2. To muster the courage or resolve to do something, typically something unpleasant or frightening. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used after "bring." I'm sorry, I just can't bring myself to eat snails.
See also: bring

bring someone to

to help someone return to consciousness. We worked to bring him to before he went into shock. He was finally brought to by the smelling salts.
See also: bring

bring someone to do something

to cause someone to do something; to encourage someone to do something. What brought you to do this? I was brought to do this by a guilty conscience.
See also: bring

bring to

1. Restore to consciousness, as in I'll see if these smelling salts will bring her to. Also see bring around, def. 2.
2. Cause a vessel to stop by heading into the wind or some other means. For example, As they neared the anchorage, they brought the boat to. This usage was first recorded in 1753.
See also: bring

bring to

v.
1. To cause a ship to turn toward the wind or come to a stop: Some lines were dragging overboard, so we brought the ship to and hauled them in again.
2. To cause someone to recover consciousness: I fainted, but the smelling salts brought me to right away.
See also: bring
References in classic literature ?
It is as much as one can bring oneself to give lips up to a husband; and, indeed, could I ever have been persuaded to marry, I believe I should not have soon been brought to endure so much.
Psychological safety - associated with one's perception of how safe it is to bring oneself to a role without fear of damage to self-image, status or career
To bring oneself to this place involves letting go of expectations about how we should be and to accept ourselves for who and what we are.
Everyone knows that it has become harder and harder to bring oneself to listen and even more difficult to induce others to do so.
What we think of as God may be found within because it is there or because it goes there, and perhaps at the time one cannot really distinguish or bring oneself to care.