bring (someone or something) to

(redirected from bring her to herself)

bring (someone or something) to

1. To cause one to regain consciousness. After Lily fainted, we used smelling salts to bring her to.
2. To stop a vessel from moving. We're getting close to the dock, so bring the boat to.
3. To add up to a certain monetary amount. Adding a drink brings your total to $8.49. I'm thrilled because my last payment brought the amount I still owe on that loan to less than $1,000!
4. To cause one to resume acting or feeling as they normally do. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "bring" and "to," and a reflexive pronoun is used after "to." I was starting to get disoriented after being awake for 36 hours straight, but a good night's rest brought me to myself.
See also: bring

bring one to oneself

to cause one to become rational; to cause one to act normal. A glass of ice water thrown in her face brought Sally to herself. I was brought to myself by some smelling salts.
See also: bring, one

bring someone to

to help someone return to consciousness. We worked to bring him to before he went into shock. He was finally brought to by the smelling salts.
See also: bring

bring to

1. Restore to consciousness, as in I'll see if these smelling salts will bring her to. Also see bring around, def. 2.
2. Cause a vessel to stop by heading into the wind or some other means. For example, As they neared the anchorage, they brought the boat to. This usage was first recorded in 1753.
See also: bring

bring to

v.
1. To cause a ship to turn toward the wind or come to a stop: Some lines were dragging overboard, so we brought the ship to and hauled them in again.
2. To cause someone to recover consciousness: I fainted, but the smelling salts brought me to right away.
See also: bring
References in classic literature ?
but is it him indeed?' and Barbara's mother says 'To be sure it is, my dear; there's nothing the matter now.' And in further assurance that he's safe and sound, Kit speaks to her again; and then Barbara goes off into another fit of laughter, and then into another fit of crying; and then Barbara's mother and Kit's mother nod to each other and pretend to scold her--but only to bring her to herself the faster, bless you!--and being experienced matrons, and acute at perceiving the first dawning symptoms of recovery, they comfort Kit with the assurance that 'she'll do now,' and so dismiss him to the place from whence he came.