bring down

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bring down

1. Literally, to bring something from a high or elevated position to a lower point. If you're going upstairs, can you bring down another dish towel for me? They won't bring down the volume when I ask nicely, so I'm calling the cops!
2. To make someone sad or worsen their mood. In this usage, a pronoun is typically used between "bring" and "down." I don't feel like going out tonight—learning that I didn't get the job really brought me down.
3. To cause the failure or defeat of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can used between "bring" and "down." The stock market crash really brought down my small business. When people stopped having a disposable income, they were reluctant to buy my cute crafts. The rebels are determined to bring down the government. Embezzlement charges were enough to bring down the corrupt CEO.
4. To decrease the cost or expense of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can used between "bring" and "down." I won't buy the house unless they bring down the price—I don't want my mortgage payment to be quite that high.
5. To cause an object or structure to collapse or fall apart. They think that a compromised foundation is what ultimately brought down the old house. Three people sitting on the chair at the same time brought it down in pieces.
6. To cause someone to stop feeling or experiencing the effects of a drug. In this usage, a pronoun is typically used between "bring" and "down." The doctors need to know what Charlie took, so they can figure out the best way to bring him down.
See also: bring, down

bringdown

1. A cause of sadness or melancholy. Getting dumped by my boyfriend was a real bring-down. Geez, that documentary about the environment was a bringdown, huh?
2. A disappointment. I thought our movie was going to be a great success, but the box office numbers for opening weekend were a real bringdown.

bring someone down

 
1. Lit. to assist or accompany someone from a higher place to a lower place. Please bring your friends down so I can meet them. She brought down her cousin, who had been taking a nap upstairs. Aunt Mattie was brought down for supper.
2. Fig. to bring someone to a place for a visit. Let's bring Tom and Terri down for a visit this weekend. We brought down Tom just last month. They were brought down at our expense for a weekend visit.
3. Fig. to restore someone to a normal mood or attitude. (After a period of elation or, perhaps, drug use.) The bad news brought me down quickly. I was afraid that the sudden change of plans would bring down the entire group.
See also: bring, down

bring something down

 
1. Lit. to move something from a higher place to a lower place. Bring that box down, please. And while you're up there, please bring down the box marked "winter clothing."
2. to lower something, such as prices, profits, taxes, etc. The governor pledged to bring taxes down. I hope they bring down taxes.
3. Fig. to defeat or overcome something, such as an enemy, a government, etc. The events of the last week will probably bring the government down. The scandal will bring down the government, I hope.
See also: bring, down

bring down

1. Cause to fall, collapse, or die. For example, The pilot won a medal for bringing down enemy aircraft, or The bill's defeat was sure to bring down the party. [c. 1300]
2. Cause a punishment or judgment, as in The bomb threats brought down the public's wrath on the terrorists [Mid-1600s]
3. Reduce, lower, as in I won't buy it till they bring down the price, or He refused to bring himself down to their level. This usage may be literal, as in the first example, or figurative, as in the second. [First half of 1500s]
See also: bring, down

bring down

v.
1. To move something or someone from a higher to a lower position: He brought down the plates from the top shelf. She brought the trunk down from the attic.
2. To cause something to fall or collapse: The explosives went off and brought down the old building. That tower is so strong that no wind could bring it down.
3. To reduce the amount or level of something: I opened the window to bring down the temperature in my room. Can you bring the volume of the stereo down a bit?
4. To remove a ruler or government from a position of power: The rebels intend to bring down the government. A strong opposition to the leaders could bring them down. The president was brought down by the scandal.
5. Slang To depress or discourage someone: The argument I had with my friends really brought me down.
See also: bring, down

bring someone down

1. tv. to terminate one’s own or someone else’s drug experience. (Drugs.) It took a lot to bring her down.
2. tv. to depress someone. The news really brought me down.
See also: bring, down, someone
References in classic literature ?
You can bring her down, but you can't show her to me
It was piteous to see the comely woman getting thinner and more worn under a bodily as well as mental restlessness, which made her often wander about the empty house after her work was done, until Maggie, becoming alarmed about her, would seek her, and bring her down by telling her how it vexed Tom that she was injuring her health by never sitting down and resting herself.
Mayon is located in Naga City, Mocha Uson, assistant secretary at the Presidential Communications Operations Office, apologized for the gaffe but at the same time hit back at bashers who she vowed would never bring her down.
Those trying to bring her down will not succeed, she said.
Washington, July 24 (ANI): American film actress Vanessa Hudgens has revealed that she tries to keep a low profile whenever out in public so as to avoid any negative comments from "haters" trying to bring her down.