bring down the house, to

bring down the house

To perform or entertain so successfully as to cause the audience to erupt in applause, laughter, or cheers for a long stretch of time. She is a rising star as a stand-up comedian, always able to bring down the house during each performance.
See also: bring, down, house

bring down the house

Also, bring the house down. Evoke tumultuous applause and cheers, as in Her solo brought the house down. This hyperbolic term suggests noise loud enough to pose a threat to the building-an unlikely occurrence. In the late 1800s, British music-hall comedians punned on it: when the audience greeted a joke with silence, they said, "Don't clap so hard; you'll bring down the house (it's a very old house)." [Mid-1700s]
See also: bring, down, house

bring down the house

To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
See also: bring, down, house

bring down the house, to

To cause an uproar of applause and cheers. The term comes from the mid-eighteenth-century theater and seems a little strange, in that a cheering audience will often rise to its feet. However, in its entirety the term later became “Don’t clap so hard; you’ll bring the house down (it’s a very old house),” and was a time-honored remark used by music-hall comedians when the audience greeted a joke with silence.
See also: bring, down