bright-line rule


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bright-line rule

In law, a clarification of ambiguity in rules and regulations, so that they cannot be interpreted in multiple ways. Since we have two different interpretations of this law, there should be a bright-line rule for it, if there isn't one already.
See also: rule
References in periodicals archive ?
The conclusion briefly discusses the policy benefits that this bright-line rule would create.
Despite the particular circumstances of Gray, the majority's bright-line rule, which bars the use of the words "deleted" or "deletion," is still favorable because it neither unduly prejudices Bell nor presents an untrue fiction to the jury.
This section proposes a bright-line rule to prevent plaintiffs from using supplemental jurisdiction to evade this requirement.
the bright-line rule of Morrison strikes a perfect balance; its application will continue to dramatically alter the securities litigation landscape.
the actual balance of the DIF, our bright-line rule does not compound a
Third, although Professor Jeffrey Fisher rightly touches on the idea of bright-line rules, (4) there are a number of areas where originalism leads away from bright-line rules.
The proposed bright-line rule would preclude the tax department from adjusting the treatment for tax purposes and require the adjustment to be made directly in the books.
A bright-line rule that prevents consideration of the pension benefits that are being received ignores the fact that some of the benefits might have accrued after the time the benefits were equitably divided.
In June 2002, the trial court refused to allow Fox to amend her complaint, relying on the bright-line rule created by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.
2) The Court held that the Fourth Amendment does not require the application of any such bright-line rule, but rather is based on a fact-specific reasonableness inquiry.
Second, HUD expects the final rule emerging from this process to achieve the impossible in addressing the qualification: a bright-line rule for reasonableness.
146) The Court's bright-line rule provides that contacts solely by "mail or common carrier" do not constitute physical presence.
At the same time, there is no bright-line rule for protecting employers' assets without running afoul of the courts and alienating employees.
263(a)-5(e) provides a bright-line rule for determining whether certain investigatory costs are facilitative.