a bright idea

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a bright idea

A unique or shrewd thought. This phrase is often used in the negative or sarcastically to show the speaker's disapproval with a particular idea. That's really a bright idea—I think we should implement it into this process in the future. Of course his car is gone—parking in a tow zone was not a bright idea!
See also: bright, idea

*bright idea

a clever thought or new idea. (*Typically: have ~; get ~; give someone ~.) Now and then I get a bright idea. John hardly ever gets a bright idea.
See also: bright, idea

bright idea

A clever thought or plan. For example, John had a bright idea for saving space-we would each have a terminal but share the printer . This term uses bright in the sense of "intelligent" or "quick-witted" and may be employed either straightforwardly, as in the example above, or ironically, as in Jumping in the pool with your clothes on-that was some bright idea. [Late 1800s]
See also: bright, idea
References in classic literature ?
I could not possibly bring her to regard the matter on its bright side as I did: and indeed I was so fearful of being charged with childish frivolity, or stupid insensibility, that I carefully kept most of my bright ideas and cheering notions to myself; well knowing they could not be appreciated.
Alice noticed with some surprise that the pebbles were all turning into little cakes as they lay on the floor, and a bright idea came into her head.
Suddenly he sprang to his feet, while his eyes lighted up with that gleam of intelligence that marks the presence of some bright idea.
The history tells that when Don Quixote called out to Sancho to bring him his helmet, Sancho was buying some curds the shepherds agreed to sell him, and flurried by the great haste his master was in did not know what to do with them or what to carry them in; so, not to lose them, for he had already paid for them, he thought it best to throw them into his master's helmet, and acting on this bright idea he went to see what his master wanted with him.
'This was a bright idea. The baron took an old hunting-knife from a cupboard hard by, and having sharpened it on his boot, made what boys call "an offer" at his throat.
But, after studiously regarding it for a minute or two, a bright idea, seemed to strike him, for he suddenly exclaimed, 'But I know what I'll do!' and then returned and took his seat at the table.
When he had communicated this bright idea, which had its origin in the perusal by the village cronies of a newspaper, containing, among other matters, an account of how some officer pending the sentence of some court-martial had been enlarged on parole, Mr Willet drew back from his guest's ear, and without any visible alteration of feature, chuckled thrice audibly.
George was about to call out and wake them up, but, at that moment, a bright idea flashed across him, and he didn't.
'Upon your word no isn't there I never did but that's like me I run away with an idea and having none to spare I keep it, alas there was a time dear Arthur that is to say decidedly not dear nor Arthur neither but you understand me when one bright idea gilded the what's-his-name horizon of et cetera but it is darkly clouded now and all is over.'
Nelly got stung by a wasp, my head began to ache, and we sat looking at one another rather dismally, when Nelly had a bright idea.
"Now, then, in this difficulty a bright idea has flashed across my brain." Franz looked at Albert as though he had not much confidence in the suggestions of his imagination.
It appears to me really a very bright idea. This sort of thing is certainly very stale.
The programme will invite bright ideas and solutions from students to focus on areas of healthcare, agriculture, education, smart cities and infrastructure, women safety, smart mobility and transportation, environment, accessibility and disability and digital literacy.
NORTH Tyneside's Beverley Park Lawn Tennis Club hosted Break Point 2019 - a national charity event created by Bright Ideas for Tennis and Robyn Moore.
The Bright Ideas Challenge asks young people aged 11-14 to use their STEM knowledge and problem-solving skills to imagine innovative solutions for making future cities clean, efficient, vibrant places to live, work and play.