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brief (one) on (someone or something)

To tell one key information about someone or something, especially some imminent issue or situation. Please brief me on the candidate that I'll be interviewing this afternoon. Someone needs to brief the CEO on the investigation before he speaks to the media.
See also: brief, on

brief (someone) about (someone or something)

To tell someone key information about someone or something, often an issue or situation. Please brief me about the candidate that I'll be interviewing this afternoon. Someone needs to brief the CEO about the investigation before he speaks to the media.
See also: brief

hold no brief for (someone or something)

To be unable or unwilling to tolerate or support someone or something. The senator has stated numerous times that he holds no brief for the "rights" of big corporations. The boss holds no brief for slackers.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

In summary; to say it briefly. The film was, in brief, dull. If you can, please explain it in brief.
See also: brief

in snatches

In or for brief periods of time. I caught the speech in snatches, but the kids were screaming in the other room so I couldn't hear the TV properly. I was so anxious about how to pay for the car repairs that I only slept in snatches.
See also: snatch
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

brief someone about someone or something

 and brief someone on someone or something
to tell someone a summary with the essential details about someone or something. We need to brief the president about the latest event. I have to brief Michael on the new procedures at work.
See also: brief

hold no brief for someone or something

not to tolerate someone or something; to be opposed to someone or something. I hold no brief for Wally and his friends. Rachel holds no brief for that kind of thing.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

briefly; concisely. The whole story, in brief, is that Bob failed algebra because he did not study. Please tell me in brief why you want this job.
See also: brief
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hold no brief for

Refuse to support, dislike, as in I hold no brief for liars. This term is a negative version of the legal expression hold a brief for, meaning "to support or defend a position by argument." The noun brief has been used in this way since the 1200s.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

Also, in short; in a word. Concisely, in few words, to sum up. All three phrases usually precede or follow a summary statement, as in In brief, we didn't get much out of his speech, or There was no agenda; in short, they could discuss whatever they wanted to, or The sun was shining, the sky was clear-in a word, it was a beautiful day. The first expression dates from the early 1400s; in short dates from the 1300s but the present usage dates from the 1700s; the hyperbolic in a word (since there is nearly always more than one word) dates from the late 1500s.
See also: brief
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hold no brief for something

BRITISH, FORMAL
If you hold no brief for a person, organization, activity or belief, you do not support them or respect them. This newspaper holds no special brief for a committee that has done nothing to distinguish itself in the past. He holds no brief for formal education. Note: In law, a brief is all the papers relating to a particular client's case that are collected by the client's solicitor and given to the barrister who will represent them in court.
See also: brief, hold, no, something

in brief

COMMON If someone says or writes something in brief, they use as few words as possible and do not give many details. This in brief is how I see the situation at the moment. The disease is discussed in brief here.
See also: brief
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

hold no brief for

not support or argue in favour of.
The brief referred to is the summary of the facts and legal points in a case given to a barrister to argue in court.
See also: brief, hold, no
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hold no ˈbrief for somebody/something

(formal) not be in favour of or not support somebody/something, for example a cause, an idea, etc: I hold no brief for long prison sentences but this terrible crime really deserves one.
Brief in this expression is the summary of facts and legal points in a case that is given to a lawyer to argue in a court. If a lawyer ‘holds no brief for’ a person, company, etc. this is not one of their clients/cases.

in ˈbrief

in a few words: I won’t give a you a long history of the dispute; in brief, it led to the business closing.And now, the news in brief.
See also: brief

in ˈsnatches

for short periods rather than continuously: Sleep came to him in brief snatches. OPPOSITE: at a stretch
See also: snatch
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in brief

In short.
See also: brief
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hold no brief for, to

To refuse to endorse, support, or defend. The term comes from law, where to hold a brief for someone means to act as counsel for that person and to argue in his or her favor. The negative form of the expression became extremely common in the nineteenth century. The OED cites R. A. Knox writing in Spiritual Aeneid (1918): “When I was at Balliol we used to adopt the phrase ‘I hold no brief for so-and-so.’”
See also: brief, hold, no
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Once you've selected your briefing from the flight-plan form, in the upper left corner of the pop-up briefing window, check "NEXTGEN View" if it's not already checked.
PML-N Senator Asif Kirmani said that the 'informative briefing' was a very important step from both, the Senate and Army's end.
PML-N Senator Nehal Hashmi told the media that the briefing had 'clarified many things'."The army chief said that there is no room for a presidential system because not only does it weaken a country, it also gives way to dangerous polarization," he said, adding that General Bajwa said that the army was 'subservient' and 'answerable to the public', and the institution has to act according to the law.
Senate Democrats Ben Cardin of Maryland and Dianne Feinstein of California wrote in (http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/12/08/donald-trump-diplomacy-phone-calls-constitution-column/95094374/) USA Today of their concerns about Trump's lack of interest in receiving briefings more frequently.
When I arrived at the White House in January 1995, a cumbersome compromise was in place: television and radio reporters could record the first three minutes of the briefing, but then the lights went off and the recorders were shut down.
They need to believe in the effectiveness of the system, to have an understanding of its place in the overall organisational strategy, to acquire the skills necessary to help them run it and to win the respect of those whom they are briefing.
Informed of the linkage between the fundraiser and the briefing by a Washington Times reporter, the White House quickly canceled the meeting.
A second breakfast briefing takes place the next day covering the subject of brands and marketing.
For years, pilots used wooden cabinets in briefing rooms to display mission planning and flight debriefing information.
NPPs also can serve as briefing documents for those negotiators who may relieve, or complement, other negotiators during an incident.
Staff also states in the briefing package that "the prevalence of cigarette ignition resistant furniture, independent of UFAC affiliation, is also high (over 80 percent)."
One of the routine, but more important duties of security assistance offices (SAOs) is to present a "pre-departure briefing" to all international military students (IMS) selected to attend schools in the United States.
TITLE: Information Management Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions: A Manager's Briefing
Reuters (NASDAQ: RTRSY), New York, has added premium global and US domestic economic forecasts to Reuters Business Briefing.
This involved extensive writing assignments, including speeches, policy statements, briefing memos, case work, and constituent letters.