brief

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brief (one) on (someone or something)

To tell one key information about someone or something, especially some imminent issue or situation. Please brief me on the candidate that I'll be interviewing this afternoon. Someone needs to brief the CEO on the investigation before he speaks to the media.
See also: brief, on

brief (someone) about (someone or something)

To tell someone key information about someone or something, often an issue or situation. Please brief me about the candidate that I'll be interviewing this afternoon. Someone needs to brief the CEO about the investigation before he speaks to the media.
See also: brief

hold no brief for (someone or something)

To be unable or unwilling to tolerate or support someone or something. The senator has stated numerous times that he holds no brief for the "rights" of big corporations. The boss holds no brief for slackers.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

In summary; to say it briefly. The film was, in brief, dull. If you can, please explain it in brief.
See also: brief

in snatches

In or for brief periods of time. I caught the speech in snatches, but the kids were screaming in the other room so I couldn't hear the TV properly. I was so anxious about how to pay for the car repairs that I only slept in snatches.
See also: snatch

brief someone about someone or something

 and brief someone on someone or something
to tell someone a summary with the essential details about someone or something. We need to brief the president about the latest event. I have to brief Michael on the new procedures at work.
See also: brief

hold no brief for someone or something

not to tolerate someone or something; to be opposed to someone or something. I hold no brief for Wally and his friends. Rachel holds no brief for that kind of thing.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

briefly; concisely. The whole story, in brief, is that Bob failed algebra because he did not study. Please tell me in brief why you want this job.
See also: brief

hold no brief for

Refuse to support, dislike, as in I hold no brief for liars. This term is a negative version of the legal expression hold a brief for, meaning "to support or defend a position by argument." The noun brief has been used in this way since the 1200s.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

Also, in short; in a word. Concisely, in few words, to sum up. All three phrases usually precede or follow a summary statement, as in In brief, we didn't get much out of his speech, or There was no agenda; in short, they could discuss whatever they wanted to, or The sun was shining, the sky was clear-in a word, it was a beautiful day. The first expression dates from the early 1400s; in short dates from the 1300s but the present usage dates from the 1700s; the hyperbolic in a word (since there is nearly always more than one word) dates from the late 1500s.
See also: brief

hold no brief for something

BRITISH, FORMAL
If you hold no brief for a person, organization, activity or belief, you do not support them or respect them. This newspaper holds no special brief for a committee that has done nothing to distinguish itself in the past. He holds no brief for formal education. Note: In law, a brief is all the papers relating to a particular client's case that are collected by the client's solicitor and given to the barrister who will represent them in court.
See also: brief, hold, no, something

in brief

COMMON If someone says or writes something in brief, they use as few words as possible and do not give many details. This in brief is how I see the situation at the moment. The disease is discussed in brief here.
See also: brief

hold no brief for

not support or argue in favour of.
The brief referred to is the summary of the facts and legal points in a case given to a barrister to argue in court.
See also: brief, hold, no

hold no ˈbrief for somebody/something

(formal) not be in favour of or not support somebody/something, for example a cause, an idea, etc: I hold no brief for long prison sentences but this terrible crime really deserves one.
Brief in this expression is the summary of facts and legal points in a case that is given to a lawyer to argue in a court. If a lawyer ‘holds no brief for’ a person, company, etc. this is not one of their clients/cases.

in ˈbrief

in a few words: I won’t give a you a long history of the dispute; in brief, it led to the business closing.And now, the news in brief.
See also: brief

in ˈsnatches

for short periods rather than continuously: Sleep came to him in brief snatches. OPPOSITE: at a stretch
See also: snatch

in brief

In short.
See also: brief

hold no brief for, to

To refuse to endorse, support, or defend. The term comes from law, where to hold a brief for someone means to act as counsel for that person and to argue in his or her favor. The negative form of the expression became extremely common in the nineteenth century. The OED cites R. A. Knox writing in Spiritual Aeneid (1918): “When I was at Balliol we used to adopt the phrase ‘I hold no brief for so-and-so.’”
See also: brief, hold, no
References in periodicals archive ?
Camilla Parker Bowles made the briefest of public appearances alongside the Prince of Wales on an official engagement yesterday.
* Any time the Blessed Sacrament is exposed for adoration, it "must never be left unattended, even for the briefest space of time" (par.
I will notice three things: they narrate in the briefest way possible the horrific events of scourging,crowning with thorns,nailing, dying literally in excruciating agony -excruciating, which means from a cross.
The fact that The Passion of the Christ ends with only but the briefest filmic allusion to the resurrection comes, then, as no surprise because it mirrors the religious and spiritual barrenness of the screen.
When I reflect on that travel and compare the ease and brevity of my travels to the rigours our ancestors underwent in even the briefest of journeys, I am moved to give thanks to God for the privilege of living in these times.
In such an overall context, it is a wasted opportunity to dismiss Bruno's Copernican diagram in the Cena, which has been at the center of a long and complex twentieth-century discussion, with only the briefest of comments based on frequently questioned nineteenth-century sources (but then, why should a magus be interested in Copernicus?) or to ignore the remarkable novelty of Bruno's designs of atomic agglomerations.
While most beneficiaries requiring an SNF level of care find that they are unable to leave the facility for even the briefest of time, the fact that a patient is granted an outside pass, or short leave of absence, for the purpose of attending a special religious service, holiday meal or family occasion, for going on a ride or for a trial visit home, is not by itself evidence that the individual no longer needs to be in a SNF to receive required skilled care.
Even the briefest browsing gives this title a `must have' status.
Occasionally editors seem to have been overzealous so one lecture is reported with the briefest of texts and no illustrations while for others strident images are given preference over informative drawings.
But what appears scandalous to one generation inevitably ends up as the jumping-off point for the next, and by the time flappers showed up in the '20s, opening and closing their knees and swinging their arms in the briefest of outfits, the can-can and the shimmy looked positively quaint.
Council President Anna Lindh made only the briefest oral presentation, reaffirming the Presidency's intentions of following on from the Nice Summit Conclusions.
So, don't underestimate the simplest lesson or the briefest wink of time.
In briefest outline, the plan is (1) to educate people about the risk and cost of long term care while they are still young enough, healthy enough, and prosperous enough to plan, save and insure, (2) to notify people simultaneously of the "LTC Contract" by which every American must acknowledge individual responsibility for his or her future long-term care expenses, (3) to extend to people who fail to insure against this risk a line of credit fully collateralized by their estates which enables them to purchase LTC services in the private marketplace, and (4) to recover the cost of care funded by such lines of credit from the estates of people who failed to plan early, prepare diligently and insure fully.
The final book under review, Will Standards Save Public Education?, is the briefest. It consists of a short essay by progressive educator Deborah Meier, principal of Mission Hill School in Boston, with responses from a variety of educators and policymakers (not all of whom agree with Meier).
Gray takes only the briefest pause before diving in to answer the blunt question, What is music?