brief


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brief (someone) about (someone or something)

To tell someone key information about someone or something, often an issue or situation. Please brief me about the candidate that I'll be interviewing this afternoon. Someone needs to brief the CEO about the investigation before he speaks to the media.
See also: brief

in brief

In summary; to say it briefly. The film was, in brief, dull. If you can, please explain it in brief.
See also: brief

hold no brief for (someone or something)

To be unable or unwilling to tolerate or support someone or something. The senators has stated numerous times that he holds no brief for the "rights" of big corporations. The boss holds no brief for slackers.
See also: brief, hold, no

in snatches

In or for brief periods of time. I caught the speech in snatches, but the kids were screaming in the other room so I couldn't hear the TV properly. I only slept in snatches. I was too anxious about how to pay for the car repairs to sleep properly.
See also: snatch

brief someone about someone or something

 and brief someone on someone or something
to tell someone a summary with the essential details about someone or something. We need to brief the president about the latest event. I have to brief Michael on the new procedures at work.
See also: brief

hold no brief for someone or something

not to tolerate someone or something; to be opposed to someone or something. I hold no brief for Wally and his friends. Rachel holds no brief for that kind of thing.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

briefly; concisely. The whole story, in brief, is that Bob failed algebra because he did not study. Please tell me in brief why you want this job.
See also: brief

hold no brief for

Refuse to support, dislike, as in I hold no brief for liars. This term is a negative version of the legal expression hold a brief for, meaning "to support or defend a position by argument." The noun brief has been used in this way since the 1200s.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

Also, in short; in a word. Concisely, in few words, to sum up. All three phrases usually precede or follow a summary statement, as in In brief, we didn't get much out of his speech, or There was no agenda; in short, they could discuss whatever they wanted to, or The sun was shining, the sky was clear-in a word, it was a beautiful day. The first expression dates from the early 1400s; in short dates from the 1300s but the present usage dates from the 1700s; the hyperbolic in a word (since there is nearly always more than one word) dates from the late 1500s.
See also: brief

hold no brief for something

BRITISH, FORMAL
If you hold no brief for a person, organization, activity or belief, you do not support them or respect them. This newspaper holds no special brief for a committee that has done nothing to distinguish itself in the past. He holds no brief for formal education. Note: In law, a brief is all the papers relating to a particular client's case that are collected by the client's solicitor and given to the barrister who will represent them in court.
See also: brief, hold, no, something

in brief

COMMON If someone says or writes something in brief, they use as few words as possible and do not give many details. This in brief is how I see the situation at the moment. The disease is discussed in brief here.
See also: brief

hold no brief for

not support or argue in favour of.
The brief referred to is the summary of the facts and legal points in a case given to a barrister to argue in court.
See also: brief, hold, no

hold no ˈbrief for somebody/something

(formal) not be in favour of or not support somebody/something, for example a cause, an idea, etc: I hold no brief for long prison sentences but this terrible crime really deserves one.
Brief in this expression is the summary of facts and legal points in a case that is given to a lawyer to argue in a court. If a lawyer ‘holds no brief for’ a person, company, etc. this is not one of their clients/cases.

in ˈbrief

in a few words: I won’t give a you a long history of the dispute; in brief, it led to the business closing.And now, the news in brief.
See also: brief

in ˈsnatches

for short periods rather than continuously: Sleep came to him in brief snatches. OPPOSITE: at a stretch
See also: snatch

in brief

In short.
See also: brief
References in periodicals archive ?
IN BRIEF Eighteen-year-old Mathieu (Jeremie Elkaim) comes to terms with coming out--and let's face it, straight or gay, the French know how to tell a flank tale of sexual awakening without the prurience that keeps American teen movies in a perpetual state of arrested adolescence.
The brief also argued that the judge erroneously instructed the jury the conviction could be based on the mental state of criminal negligence rather than willful endangerment.
On sidewalk quarrel, see MSLL Bound Briefs, Elizabeth Doty v.
The Brief Reporter has been available on the Internet since March 1998 at http://www.
The Bloomberg Brief series is available to subscribers of the Bloomberg Professional service at {BRIEF <GO>}.
The AU brief rejects claims that the school board had a secular reason for using the sticker.
TEI's brief went into considerable detail about the procedure for issuing revenue rulings, which it described as mere litigating positions and not entitled to any deference.
Most of the brief is devoted to the violent acts of others - here's Hearst, machine gun in hand, robbing the Hibernia Bank in San Francisco in April 1974; there's Hearst spraying the front of Mel's Sporting Goods in Los Angeles with machine-gun fire a month later.
Although the reply brief characterizes the Institute's contention that revenue rulings represent mere litigating positions as "plainly incorrect," the government fails to support that statement.
Microsoft had apparently concluded that it has nothing to lose by ignoring the Judge's comments discouraging further briefs, since Judge Jackson had apparently already made his decision to break the company up.
The CLWA move comes on the heels of state Attorney General Bill Lockyer's request earlier this month to file a friend of the court brief in Ventura County's challenge to Newhall Ranch.
The administration brief sides with two Kentucky counties that were ordered to remove Commandments displays from their courthouses.
The brief was filed by a team of outside lawyers brought in by the Justice Department last year to fight what had been a secret battle until the appeals court's opinion was unsealed 10 days ago.
Americans United and allied civil liberties groups filed a friend-of-the-court brief Feb.
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