brother

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Am I my brother's keeper?

I'm not responsible for the actions, behavior, or whereabouts of my close relative or friend (not necessarily a brother). Often used to express frustration that such responsibility is assumed. How should I know where Mary is? Am I my brother's keeper?

be (all) brothers/sisters under the skin

Of two or more people, to have thoughts or feelings in common, despite other obvious differences between them. As much as you dislike your chatty new co-worker, she's as nervous and insecure as you are—you're really sisters under the skin.
See also: brother, sister, skin

be (not) (one's) brother's keeper

To be responsible for the actions, behavior, or whereabouts of one's close relative or friend (not necessarily a brother). Often used in the negative to express frustration that such responsibility is assumed. Of course I'm disappointed that Travis got arrested again, but I'm not my brother's keeper. When I'm babysitting him, I'm my brother's keeper.
See also: keeper

big brother

1. One's older brother. My big brother said he would help us move the couch. Andrew is Julie's big brother.
2. A shorthand reference to oppressive rule that was popularized by George Orwell's dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. In this usage, the phrase is usually capitalized. You have to be careful what you write in an email these days. Big Brother is watching you, after all.
See also: big, brother

Big Brother is watching you

A phrase taken from George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, meaning one's actions and intentions are being monitored by the government as a means of controlling and suppressing the will of the populace. You have to be careful what you write in an email these days. Big Brother is watching you, after all.
See also: big, brother, watch

blood brother

A boy or man who has sworn loyalty to another despite not being biologically related. When Jake and Tim entered the battlefield, they became blood brothers, vowing to protect each other from harm's way.
See also: blood, brother

everybody and his brother

A lot of people. The phrase is not only used to apply to men. Geez, everybody and his brother was riding the subway with me this morning—I could barely push through the crowd at my stop!
See also: and, brother, everybody

everybody and their brother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their brother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, brother, everybody

everyone and his brother

A lot of people. The phrase is not only used to apply to men. Geez, everyone and his brother was riding the subway with me this morning—I could barely push through the crowd at my stop!
See also: and, brother, everyone

everyone and their brother

A large number or a majority of people. Used hyperbolically. Everyone and their brother is going to be at the wedding this July, I hope I can make it too.
See also: and, brother, everyone

I'm not my brother's keeper

I'm not responsible for the actions, behavior, or whereabouts of my close relative or friend (not necessarily a brother). Often used to express frustration that such responsibility is assumed. Of course I'm disappointed that Travis got arrested again, but I'm not my brother's keeper. How should I know where Mary is? I'm not my brother's keeper.
See also: keeper, not

not (one's) brother's keeper

Not responsible for the actions, behavior, or whereabouts of one's close relative or friend (not necessarily a brother). Often used to express frustration that such responsibility is assumed. Of course I'm disappointed that Travis got arrested again, but I'm not my brother's keeper. How should I know where Mary is? I'm not my brother's keeper.
See also: keeper, not

older brother

A male who is older than one or more of his siblings. I'll ask my older brother to help us with the move. Connie's older brother will be there on Saturday, and I'd really like you to meet him. Our neighbor Jim was like an older brother to me when I was growing up.
See also: brother, older

soul brother

1. An African-American man, especially one who strives to better the lives of other African-Americans. Jason was a true man—a man who fought tirelessly for his family and his community. He was a soul brother, and he will not be forgotten.
2. A man with whom one shares an intense, intimate, emotional connection. When I got my first acting gig at 18, I was just a scared, cocky kid. But I found a soul brother in Harvey. He took me under his wing, and helped me grow into the kind of man I'd always wanted to be.
See also: brother, soul

younger brother

One's younger male sibling. Yeah, I have a younger brother—his name is Jim. Johnny is Bella's younger brother.
See also: brother, young

be one's brother's keeper

to be responsible for someone else. (Used of others besides just real brothers.) I can't force these kids to go to school and get an education so they can get jobs. I am not my brother's keeper. You can't expect me to be my brother's keeper. Each of us should be responsible for himself! be one's own man and be one's own master to be someone who is not controlled by other people; to be an independent person. Bert longed to be his own master, but at the same time feared losing the security he had as the employee of a large company. When I go away to college, I'll be my own man. My parents won't be able to tell me what to do anymore.
See also: keeper

everybody and his brother

 and everybody and his uncle
Fig. everybody; lots of people. The state fair was packed. Everybody and his brother was there. Everybody and his uncle was asking me where you was today.
See also: and, brother, everybody

I am not my brother's keeper.

 and Am I my brother's keeper?
Prov. You are not responsible for another person's doings or whereabouts. (Biblical.) Fred: Where's Robert? Jane: Am I my brother's keeper? Jill: How could you let Jane run off like that? Alan: I'm not my brother's keeper.
See also: keeper, not

(soul) brother

a black person's male, black friend. Another brother took a fall last night. Terry's a soul brother, and I'll do anything for him.

not your brother's keeper

You can say that you are not your brother's keeper to indicate that you do not accept responsibility for other people in any way. Part of me wants to help him, but part of me realizes I can't be my brother's keeper. Note: These expressions come from a story in the Bible. Cain has killed his brother, Abel, but tries to deny it. `And the Lord said unto Cain, Where is Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: Am I my brother's keeper?' (Genesis 4:9)
See also: keeper, not

Big brother

the state perceived as a sinister force supervising citizens' lives.
Big brother comes from the slogan Big Brother is watching you in George Orwell's novel 1984.
See also: big, brother

ˌBig ˈBrother (is watching you)

a leader, a person in authority or a government that tries to control every aspect of people’s lives: We live in a society where all kinds of information about the individual may be stored on computer. Big Brother, if not actually watching you, can quickly check on you if he wants to.This comes from the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell, in which the leader of the government, Big Brother, had total control over people. The slogan ‘Big Brother is watching you’ reminded people that he knew everything they did.
See also: big, brother

be (all) brothers/sisters under the ˈskin

be men/women with similar feelings, in spite of outside appearances, position, etc: Actors and politicians are brothers under the skin. They both need public approval.
See also: brother, sister, skin

big brother

1. n. a personification of the totalitarian state. (From George Orwell’s 1984.) Big brother has changed the tax laws again.
2. n. someone who personifies the totalitarian state: the police, parents, teachers. Big brother says the paper is due tomorrow, or else.
See also: big, brother

blood (brother)

n. a fellow black male. (see also blood.) One of the bloods came up to say hello.
See also: blood, brother

brews brothers

n. (male) beer-drinking college students. (A play on The Blues Brothers, a popular movie released in 1980.) You guys look like the devil and you smell like the brews brothers.
See also: brew, brother

(soul) brother

n. a black person’s male, black friend. Another brother took a fall last night.
See also: brother, soul

brother

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout the 19th century, there were multiple theological arguments related to the Brethren mode of baptism and a tightening of the requirement that Brethren could only become members if they received baptism by forward trine immersion.
(12) In 1848, Annual Conference, the Brethren governing body, wrote a formula for baptism.
Brethren also feared innovation and adopting practices found in other denominations.
This history points to the fact that Brethren repeatedly expressed concerns about the ways that other Christian groups were potentially impacting and corrupting the "true" practice of baptism, which Brethren understood as trine forward immersion.
Brethren have continually reinforced several key theological themes in relation to baptism.
Brethren have not held, however, that baptism is a requirement for salvation.
A second important area of continuity in Brethren belief has been the notion of covenant.
The key point of belief for Brethren around baptism, then, relates to the close connection Brethren have held between obedience and the actual act of baptism.
However, they precipitated the Brethren decision to inaugurate a new congregation through immersion baptism in 1708 in Schwarzenau, their place of refuge in Wittgenstein.
He argues that "the Brethren must be seen primarily within the Anabaptist heritage," yet without ignoring that "certain elements of their radical Pietist background remained with them" (63).
The book includes chapters on Brethren expansion to Ysenburg, Crefeld and Friesland in Europe, and on external suppression and finally their emigration to Pennsylvania.
Durnbaugh has sumptuously documented his story of Brethren beginnings with endnotes that continue to serve scholars well.
The Brethren Encyclopedia can be congratulated for printing this work.
The repeated use of brethren, rather than brothers, in Act I of Titus Andronicus thus differentiates this piece of writing from anything else of comparable size in the Shakespeare canon.
The Tittus references (from Spevack, Riverside numbering) are: brethren I.i.89, 104, 122, 123, 146, 160 (brethren's), 348, 357, V.i.104; brothers I.i.287, III.1.30, 49, 109, 111, 166 (brothers'), 180, V.ii.173, V.iii.100.