breezy

(redirected from breeziness)
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be bright and breezy

To be confident and cheerful. I may be bright and breezy now, but I often felt melancholy as a teenager.
See also: and, breezy, bright

bright and breezy

Confident and cheerful. I may be bright and breezy now, but I often felt melancholy as a teenager.
See also: and, breezy, bright

bright and breezy

cheery and alert. You look all bright and breezy this morning. Bright and breezy people on a gloomy day like this make me sick.
See also: and, breezy, bright
References in periodicals archive ?
Kingsolver's breeziness sometimes sounds heartless, for it appears to discount as ludicrous people who have committed no greater crime than holding values different from hers.
Jennings' often-fanciful parallels between biblical and modern gay and lesbian culture lend his work a welcome breeziness of tone, but they risk making his insightful readings of these highly provocative biblical texts easier to discount and, regrettably, to resist.
In his re-creation of a turbulent era and its main protagonists, he captures the two peoples' essence with a lightness of touch and a breeziness of style that, without wounding, reach their intended targets.
Though small in stature, she had a distinctive raspy voice perfect for satiric irony and played the role with a puckish breeziness that acted as a fitting counterweight to Berowne and the men in general.
29) is relieved by a certain melodic breeziness. The text of "Why Do I Use My Paper, Ink, and Pen" (no.
Perhaps there is a risk that breeziness will be equated by some readers with something more insidious.
Gass might celebrate the preeminence of Ralph Waldo Emerson's essays, their pertinence and intelligence, as he does in "Emerson and the Essay" (found in Habitations of the Word), but his own combination of breeziness and erudition produces essays on a wide range of topics--mass culture, the nature of prose in fiction, directions of the contemporary novel, to name a few--that will probably stand as seminal statements for and about late twentieth-and early twenty-first-century culture, specifically the culture of the novel.
He also lends Petrarch's poetry a good deal of the freshness, perhaps even the breeziness, of our modern idiom, which is also his aim, and an entirely defensible one.
Spicer's melodies composed as modern counterparts to traditional Bach chorales have an evangelical breeziness about them that sounds quite incongruous - and the work is too long.
The melody, with its staccato hops between notes, calls for a breeziness that Lestingois cannot at this moment muster.
After a while, however, readers will begin to realize that for all the breeziness, not much of the inner man is revealed.
But Honore redeems his breeziness by opening real windows on the stale old complaints of busyness and breakneck pace.
Powell could have a tendency to seem stuffy; Barber's breeziness undercuts this slight pomposity without ever tainting his sympathy for the man and his work.
We are also impressed, in spite of the breeziness, by her courage, resourcefulness, and smarts.