breeze

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bat the breeze

To chat or converse aimlessly or casually, without any serious topic of conversation. Customers always want to bat the breeze with me in the store before they buy something. I just batted the breeze with John for a while when he passed me on the street.
See also: bat, breeze

breeze along

To proceed in a relaxed or casual way without worry. Before her sudden illness, Jenna had been breezing along through life. I admire how kids just breeze along without a care in the world.
See also: breeze

breeze away

To depart quickly or unexpectedly. Brian breezed away before I had a chance to say goodbye to him.
See also: away, breeze

breeze in(to)

To walk into a place or event with a calm or carefree attitude. (If "into" is used, a place or event is named after it.) Walking into a party always makes me nervous, but my husband can breeze in without the slightest hesitation. You need to talk to that intern—he regularly breezes into work an hour late.
See also: breeze

breeze off

To depart quickly or unexpectedly. Brian breezed off before I had a chance to say goodbye to him.
See also: breeze, off

breeze out

To depart quickly or unexpectedly. Brian breezed out before I had a chance to say goodbye to him. You need to talk to that intern—he regularly breezes out of the office an hour early.
See also: breeze, out

breeze past (someone or something)

1. To move past someone or something very quickly, especially in an inconsiderate, dismissive, or disinterested manner. Some jerk came into the bank and breezed past the entire line of people, as if they weren't even there. The boss breezed past my desk without even saying hello.
2. To ignore or disregard some problem, issue, topic, etc. I tried to pin down the senator's position on the tax proposal, but he just breezed past my question. We can't just breeze past these financial issues, Janet. We've got to do something about them as soon as possible.
3. To surpass someone or something in a contest or competition. The young senator, once considered an underdog, has breezed past his opponent in the polls. She breezed past the other competitors in the qualifying round of the tournament.
See also: breeze, past

breeze through (something)

1. To do something easily with little effort or concern. It's so frustrating that my best friend can just breeze through chemistry while I study for days and barely get a passing grade.
2. To travel through some place quickly and with little interest. Europe isn't a place you can just breeze through—there are so many famous sites to visit!
See also: breeze, through

breeze up

1. Of wind, to begin to blow steadily, especially in a favorable or pleasant manner. A northeasterly wind finally breezed up and filled our sails.
2. To come up (to someone or something) quickly and in a confident, carefree, or buoyant manner. Usually followed by "to someone or something." I was nervous about asking the cashier for a refund, but Sarah breezed right up and got it done without batting an eye. Tim breezed up to the professor and told him he wouldn't have his essay done in time.
See also: breeze, up

breeze up to (someone or something)

To come up (to someone or something) quickly and in a confident, carefree, or buoyant manner. I was sure we would get caught, but Sarah breezed right up to display and walked off with $500 worth of electronics. Tim breezed up to the professor and told him he wouldn't have his essay done in time.
See also: breeze, up

fan the breeze

To chat or converse aimlessly or casually, without any serious topic of conversation. Customers always want to fan the breeze with me in the store before they buy something. I just fanned the breeze with John for a while when he passed me on the street.
See also: breeze, fan

flow with the breeze

1. Literally, to be blown about by the wind. It's so nice to walk along the beach in the warm sunshine, my hair flowing with the breeze.
2. To nonchalantly engage in a situation without trying to change it or assert control over it. You're such a control freak—can't you just flow with the breeze for once? I try not to plan too much when I take a vacation to a new place. I like to just flow with the breeze when I get there.
See also: breeze, flow

hands down

Easily, decisively, or without question. The term originates from horse racing, in which jockeys assured of a victory may lower their hold on the reins in the final stretch. This is the best pie I've ever had, hands down! We were really unprepared for our last game, and the other team won hands down.
See also: down, hand

in a breeze

Easily; handily; without much or any effort. Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a breeze.
See also: breeze

shoot the breeze

To chat or converse aimlessly or casually, without any serious topic of conversation. Customers always want to shoot the breeze with me in the store before they buy something. I just shot the breeze with John for a while when he passed me on the street.
See also: breeze, shoot
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

breeze along

Fig. to travel along casually, rapidly, and happily; to go through life in a casual and carefree manner. Kristine was just breezing along the road when she ran off onto the shoulder. We just breezed along the highway, barely paying attention to what we were doing. Don't just breeze along through life!
See also: breeze

breeze away

to leave quickly or abruptly. She said nothing more. She just breezed away. I breezed away without stopping to say good-bye.
See also: away, breeze

breeze in

(from some place) Go to sweep in (from some place).
See also: breeze

breeze in (to some place)

to enter a place quickly, in a happy and carefree manner. She breezed into the conference room and sat down at the head of the table. Jerry breezed in and said hello.
See also: breeze

breeze off

to leave quickly or abruptly. Don't just breeze off! Stay and talk. Lily breezed off in a huffy manner.
See also: breeze, off

breeze out (of some place)

to leave a place quickly. She was here for a moment and then suddenly breezed out. She breezed out of the room in an instant.
See also: breeze, out

breeze through

 (something)
1. Fig. to complete some task rapidly and easily. I breezed through my calculus assignment in no time at all. It was not hard. I just breezed through.
2. Fig. to travel through a place rapidly. They breezed through every little town without stopping. We didn't stop. We just breezed through.
See also: breeze, through

fan the breeze

Fig. to chat or gossip. We're just fanning the breeze, so you didn't interrupt anything. Stop fanning the breeze and get to work.
See also: breeze, fan

hands down

easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down. They declared her the winner hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

Fig. to chat casually and without purpose. We spent the entire afternoon just shooting the breeze. It was good to shoot the breeze with you, Mary.
See also: breeze, shoot
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

breeze in

1. Arrive in a casual way, as in She breezed in, two hours late. This phrase transfers the blowing of a light wind to human entrances. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
2. Win easily, as in A fine golfer, he breezed in first. This usage at first alluded to horse racing but soon was transferred to more general use. [c. 1900]
See also: breeze

hands down

1. Also, in a breeze; in a walk. Easily, without effort, as in She won the election hands down, or They won in a breeze, 10-0, or The top players get through the first rounds of the tournament in a walk. All of these expressions originated in sports. Hands down, dating from the mid-1800s, comes from horse racing, where jockeys drop their hands downward and relax their hold when they are sure to win. In a breeze, first recorded in a baseball magazine in 1910, alludes to the rapid and easy passage of moving air; in a walk, also from baseball, alludes to taking a base on balls, that is, reaching first base without having hit a pitched ball because of the pitcher's mistakes.
2. Unquestionably, without a doubt, as in Hands down, it was the best thing I've ever done.
See also: down, hand

in a breeze

see under hands down.
See also: breeze

shoot the breeze

Also, shoot or throw the bull . Talk idly, chat, as in They've been sitting on the porch for hours, just shooting the breeze, or The guys sit around the locker room, throwing the bull. The first of these slangy terms, alluding to talking into the wind, was first recorded in 1919. In the variant, first recorded in 1908, bull is a shortening of bullshit, and means "empty talk" or "lies."
See also: breeze, shoot

win hands down

Also, win in a walk or breeze . See under hands down.
See also: down, hand, win
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shoot the breeze

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you shoot the breeze, you talk with other people in an informal and friendly way. Goldie does what she likes doing best: shooting the breeze about life, love, and her bad reputation. He's very awkward on social occasions. If you're sitting around a big table in the members' dining room, he won't shoot the breeze like the rest of them. Note: The sense of `shoot' used here is the same as `shoot the rapids', suggesting riding or being carried along by the flow of a conversation.
See also: breeze, shoot

win hands down

COMMON
1. If you win a contest hands down, you win it easily. We have been beaten in some games which we should have won hands down. Note: You can also say that you beat someone else hands down. When he said he would beat me hands down, I didn't expect him to run like that.
2. When you are comparing things, you can say that the thing which is clearly best wins hands down. The New Winter Palace Hotel wins hands down for both comfort and location. Note: You can also say that one thing beats another hands down. I had always enjoyed driving through the New Forest, but two-wheeled travel beats the car hands down. Note: You can also talk about a hands-down winner. In any bar debate about the best Canadian folk song of all time, the hands-down winner is always Tyson's Summer Wages. Note: Hands down is used in other structures where you are saying that something is clearly the best. We are hands-down, flat-out the leaders of the world in this. `The greatest thing ever invented has to be the Thermos flask,' I said. `Easy. Hands down.' Note: This expression was originally used in horse racing to describe jockeys who won their races very easily and could cross the winning line with their hands lowered and the reins loose.
See also: down, hand, win
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

hands down

(especially of winning) easily and decisively.
Originally a horse-racing expression, win hands down meant that a jockey was so certain of victory in the closing stages of a race that he could lower his hands, thereby relaxing his hold on the reins and ceasing to urge on his horse.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze (or the bull)

have a casual conversation. North American informal
See also: breeze, shoot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shoot the ˈbreeze

(also shoot the ˈbull/ˈshit taboo) (both American English, informal) talk in a friendly, informal way; chat: We sat around in the bar, shooting the breeze.
See also: breeze, shoot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

breeze through

v.
1. To pass through some place swiftly and without lingering: The couple breezed through the room before anyone could say hello to them.
2. To make progress with something swiftly and effortlessly: The smart student breezed through the test.
See also: breeze, through
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

breeze

n. an easy task. Nothing to it. It was a breeze.

fan the breeze

tv. to chat or gossip. We’re just fanning the breeze, so you didn’t interrupt anything.
See also: breeze, fan

hands down

mod. easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

tv. to chat casually and without purpose. We spent the entire afternoon just shooting the breeze.
See also: breeze, shoot
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

hands down

1. With no trouble; easily.
2. Indisputably; unquestionably.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

/bull Slang
To spend time talking in an idle manner; talk idly.
See also: breeze, shoot
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hands down

Easily, without effort. The term comes from racing, where a jockey may drop his hands and relax his hold on the reins when he is sure to win the race. Dating from the mid-nineteenth century, the term still is used with regard to various kinds of competition, as in, “She won the nomination hands down.”
See also: down, hand
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
"Now, dear Breeze," said Ripple, "fly straight upward through the air, until we reach the place we have so long been seeking; Sunbeam shall go before to light the way, Yellow-leaf shall shelter me from heat and rain, while Snow-flake shall lie here beside me till it comes of use.
So hasten on, good Breeze, and bring me quickly to my journey's end."
Then Ripple told how she had wandered round the world in search of them, how the Seasons had most kindly helped her on, by giving Sun-beam, Breeze, Leaf, and Flake; and how, through many dangers, she had come at last to ask of them the magic flame that could give life to the little child again.
So far and wide she searched among the caverns of the sea, and gathered all the brightest jewels shining there; and then upon her faithful Breeze once more went journeying through the sky.
Now Sunbeam, Breeze, Leaf, and Flake, fly back to the Seasons whence you came, and tell them that, thanks to their kind gifts, Ripple's work at last is done."
Of course you must go slowly and carefully, and avoid making any breeze."
It was the steady breeze I had been expecting so long.
And when the Reindeer was high and proud on the water once more, we dashed away with the breeze on our quarter, and at the last possible moment crossed the mud flats and entered the slough.
Before supper was eaten we buried old Tom in the sand and stood round him for a while bare-headed in the breeze. A good deal of firewood had been got in, but not enough for the captain's fancy, and he shook his head over it and told us we "must get back to this tomorrow rather livelier." Then, when we had eaten our pork and each had a good stiff glass of brandy grog, the three chiefs got together in a corner to discuss our prospects.
It was a capricious breeze, coming from the coast, and after it passed the sea became smooth.
Suddenly, the end of the rainbow lifted and its colors slowly faded like mist before a breeze. Dorothy sighed deeply and turned to Ozma.
In summer, katabatic winds are weaker than in winter because of differences in how much heat can be lost from the source region and to local sea breezes. The sea breezes dominate the summer wind regime because of the heating of the soil-covered valley floors compared to the cooler ice-covered ocean [9].
"Christie has come here for experience and there was never going to be any rivalry between us," added Breeze, "She has qualified in less than 18 months and represented Wales and we have had two people from Breezes Gym at the Commonwealth Games."
Breezes Resorts & Spas Fly Away With Breezes Resorts & Spas and Receive up to $630 Air Credit When You Book By August 3.
They swirled invisibly, like the breezes they illuminated.