breeze


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bat the breeze

To chat or converse aimlessly or casually, without any serious topic of conversation. Customers always want to bat the breeze with me in the store before they buy something. I just batted the breeze with John for a while when he passed me on the street.
See also: bat, breeze

in a breeze

Easily; handily; without much or any effort. Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a breeze.
See also: breeze

breeze along

To proceed in a relaxed or casual way without worry. Before her sudden illness, Jenna had been breezing along through life. I admire how kids just breeze along without a care in the world.
See also: breeze

breeze away

To depart quickly or unexpectedly. Brian breezed away before I had a chance to say goodbye to him.
See also: away, breeze

breeze in(to)

To walk into a place or event with a calm or carefree attitude. (If "into" is used, a place or event is named after it.) Walking into a party always makes me nervous, but my husband can breeze in without the slightest hesitation. You need to talk to that intern—he regularly breezes into work an hour late.
See also: breeze

breeze off

To depart quickly or unexpectedly. Brian breezed off before I had a chance to say goodbye to him.
See also: breeze, off

breeze out

To depart quickly or unexpectedly. (A specific place or event can be named after "out.") Brian breezed out before I had a chance to say goodbye to him. You need to talk to that intern—he regularly breezes out of the office an hour early.
See also: breeze, out

breeze through (something)

1. To do something easily with little effort or concern. It's so frustrating that my best friend can just breeze through chemistry while I study for days and barely get a passing grade.
2. To travel through some place quickly and with little interest. Europe isn't a place you can just breeze through—there are so many famous sites to visit!
See also: breeze, through

hands down

Easily, decisively, or without question. The term originates from horse racing, in which jockeys assured of a victory may lower their hold on the reins in the final stretch. This is the best pie I've ever had, hands down! We were really unprepared for our last game, and the other team won hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

To chat or converse aimlessly or casually, without any serious topic of conversation. Customers always want to shoot the breeze with me in the store before they buy something. I just shot the breeze with John for a while when he passed me on the street.
See also: breeze, shoot

breeze along

Fig. to travel along casually, rapidly, and happily; to go through life in a casual and carefree manner. Kristine was just breezing along the road when she ran off onto the shoulder. We just breezed along the highway, barely paying attention to what we were doing. Don't just breeze along through life!
See also: breeze

breeze away

to leave quickly or abruptly. She said nothing more. She just breezed away. I breezed away without stopping to say good-bye.
See also: away, breeze

breeze in

(from some place) Go to sweep in (from some place).
See also: breeze

breeze in (to some place)

to enter a place quickly, in a happy and carefree manner. She breezed into the conference room and sat down at the head of the table. Jerry breezed in and said hello.
See also: breeze

breeze off

to leave quickly or abruptly. Don't just breeze off! Stay and talk. Lily breezed off in a huffy manner.
See also: breeze, off

breeze out (of some place)

to leave a place quickly. She was here for a moment and then suddenly breezed out. She breezed out of the room in an instant.
See also: breeze, out

breeze through

 (something)
1. Fig. to complete some task rapidly and easily. I breezed through my calculus assignment in no time at all. It was not hard. I just breezed through.
2. Fig. to travel through a place rapidly. They breezed through every little town without stopping. We didn't stop. We just breezed through.
See also: breeze, through

fan the breeze

Fig. to chat or gossip. We're just fanning the breeze, so you didn't interrupt anything. Stop fanning the breeze and get to work.
See also: breeze, fan

hands down

easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down. They declared her the winner hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

Fig. to chat casually and without purpose. We spent the entire afternoon just shooting the breeze. It was good to shoot the breeze with you, Mary.
See also: breeze, shoot

breeze in

1. Arrive in a casual way, as in She breezed in, two hours late. This phrase transfers the blowing of a light wind to human entrances. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
2. Win easily, as in A fine golfer, he breezed in first. This usage at first alluded to horse racing but soon was transferred to more general use. [c. 1900]
See also: breeze

hands down

1. Also, in a breeze; in a walk. Easily, without effort, as in She won the election hands down, or They won in a breeze, 10-0, or The top players get through the first rounds of the tournament in a walk. All of these expressions originated in sports. Hands down, dating from the mid-1800s, comes from horse racing, where jockeys drop their hands downward and relax their hold when they are sure to win. In a breeze, first recorded in a baseball magazine in 1910, alludes to the rapid and easy passage of moving air; in a walk, also from baseball, alludes to taking a base on balls, that is, reaching first base without having hit a pitched ball because of the pitcher's mistakes.
2. Unquestionably, without a doubt, as in Hands down, it was the best thing I've ever done.
See also: down, hand

in a breeze

see under hands down.
See also: breeze

shoot the breeze

Also, shoot or throw the bull . Talk idly, chat, as in They've been sitting on the porch for hours, just shooting the breeze, or The guys sit around the locker room, throwing the bull. The first of these slangy terms, alluding to talking into the wind, was first recorded in 1919. In the variant, first recorded in 1908, bull is a shortening of bullshit, and means "empty talk" or "lies."
See also: breeze, shoot

win hands down

Also, win in a walk or breeze . See under hands down.
See also: down, hand, win

shoot the breeze

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you shoot the breeze, you talk with other people in an informal and friendly way. Goldie does what she likes doing best: shooting the breeze about life, love, and her bad reputation. He's very awkward on social occasions. If you're sitting around a big table in the members' dining room, he won't shoot the breeze like the rest of them. Note: The sense of `shoot' used here is the same as `shoot the rapids', suggesting riding or being carried along by the flow of a conversation.
See also: breeze, shoot

win hands down

COMMON
1. If you win a contest hands down, you win it easily. We have been beaten in some games which we should have won hands down. Note: You can also say that you beat someone else hands down. When he said he would beat me hands down, I didn't expect him to run like that.
2. When you are comparing things, you can say that the thing which is clearly best wins hands down. The New Winter Palace Hotel wins hands down for both comfort and location. Note: You can also say that one thing beats another hands down. I had always enjoyed driving through the New Forest, but two-wheeled travel beats the car hands down. Note: You can also talk about a hands-down winner. In any bar debate about the best Canadian folk song of all time, the hands-down winner is always Tyson's Summer Wages. Note: Hands down is used in other structures where you are saying that something is clearly the best. We are hands-down, flat-out the leaders of the world in this. `The greatest thing ever invented has to be the Thermos flask,' I said. `Easy. Hands down.' Note: This expression was originally used in horse racing to describe jockeys who won their races very easily and could cross the winning line with their hands lowered and the reins loose.
See also: down, hand, win

hands down

(especially of winning) easily and decisively.
Originally a horse-racing expression, win hands down meant that a jockey was so certain of victory in the closing stages of a race that he could lower his hands, thereby relaxing his hold on the reins and ceasing to urge on his horse.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze (or the bull)

have a casual conversation. North American informal
See also: breeze, shoot

shoot the ˈbreeze

(also shoot the ˈbull/ˈshit taboo) (both American English, informal) talk in a friendly, informal way; chat: We sat around in the bar, shooting the breeze.
See also: breeze, shoot

breeze through

v.
1. To pass through some place swiftly and without lingering: The couple breezed through the room before anyone could say hello to them.
2. To make progress with something swiftly and effortlessly: The smart student breezed through the test.
See also: breeze, through

breeze

n. an easy task. Nothing to it. It was a breeze.

fan the breeze

tv. to chat or gossip. We’re just fanning the breeze, so you didn’t interrupt anything.
See also: breeze, fan

hands down

mod. easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

tv. to chat casually and without purpose. We spent the entire afternoon just shooting the breeze.
See also: breeze, shoot

hands down

1. With no trouble; easily.
2. Indisputably; unquestionably.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

/bull Slang
To spend time talking in an idle manner; talk idly.
See also: breeze, shoot
References in periodicals archive ?
The cartoon version of smiley schoolgirl Breeze has a brilliant superpower - the ability to fix things to make people feel better.
Most basic is to simply let the breeze take us where it wants us to go.
The judge told Breeze that it was a "cowardly" attack when the victim was defenceless on the floor.
But after setting up a gym in Aberdare, Breeze decided to come out of retirement and compete in Glasgow.
The Breeze organisers are looking for women to lead the rides.
It's a key milestone for our property to launch the first Breeze Spa in the Middle East, and an additional privilege that Breeze Spa has chosen Amari Doha for its worldwide launch of its signature men's treatments," said Amari Doha general manager Damian Ball.
25 June 2012 - An investment bank, based in New York, will act as financial advisor, lead arranger and sole placement agent of Island Breeze International Inc's (OTCQB:IBII) private placement of securities, the US entertainment cruise projects developer and operator said on Friday.
However, the impact of sea breeze on urban thermal environment is very much depending on its intensity.
Carnival Cruise Lines, a US-based cruise line and a brand of Carnival Corporation and plc (NYSE/LSE: CCL) (NYSE: CUK), has announced its Live the Carnival Breeze Life campaign, celebrating the debut of the Carnival Breeze cruise ship.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-July 22, 2011-AT&T launches new breEZe III phone from Pantech(C)1994-2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.
In his first bout since suffering broken ribs in the novice semi-finals he had to show grit and determination to overcome the home club's David Breeze.
Sciacqua, 37, will be taking over the print and online editions of the Daily Breeze, a 65,000 circulation daily paper covering the South Bay and Harbor Area.
The book begins when her worried parents find Breeze unconscious near the shore.
Gino Lee Breeze, 20, is today behind bars for the bizarre and humiliating attack at the victim's own home in Bangor, during which he threatened to have him shot and his house petrol bombed.
Fernando started Breeze Design Studio in 2007 after a group of six designers approached him with their portfolios and asked the Sri Lankan native to back them financially.