breed

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Related to breeds: Cat breeds, Dairy breeds

breed like rabbits

slang To have several babies in a short period of time. (Rabbits are known to produce a large number of offspring very rapidly.) I can't believe my sister is pregnant for the fourth time in five years. She and her husband just breed like rabbits!
See also: breed, like, rabbit

familiarity breeds contempt

Repeated exposure to someone or something often creates a contentious relationship. A: "Those two teams have built up quite a rivalry over the years." B: "They play in the same division, and familiarity breeds contempt." I've been stuck with Larry in the office all week, and I'm afraid they're right that familiary breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

a breed apart

A type or group of people that is markedly superior to or unique from most others. Citizens from that state have long considered themselves a breed apart from the rest of the country, and there has been a growing movement to gain secession in recent years. Watching her performance on the field yesterday, it is clearer than ever that the team's captain is truly a breed apart.
See also: apart, breed

breed up a storm

Of the weather, to become overcast. I wouldn't go outside right now—it looks to be breeding up a storm.
See also: breed, storm, up

like breeds like

1. A person will usually adopt similar beliefs, characteristics, or behavior to those they spend the most time with, such as family, friends, colleagues, etc. Well, is it any surprise he's acts way, considering his father's behavior? Like breeds like, after all. Like breeds like, and if you're running a company with questionable ethics, don't be surprised if your employees aren't the most morally upright people in the world.
2. People tend to associate with those who share the same beliefs or behaviors, which in turn reinforces them. Like breeds like when it comes to mainstream political discourse, and this has become even more evident in the age of social media. People don't want to examine their own actions or beliefs with a critical eye, they just want to be surrounded by those who are the same or approve of it. Like breeds like, after all.
See also: breed, like

love breeds love

If you show love, kindness, and goodwill toward someone, it will typically cause them to behave in a similar way to yourself or to others. I feel like we as a people are losing the notion that love breeds love these days, choosing instead to attack or criticize other people as our default reaction. I've always taken the stance that love breeds love, and, in my own experience, anyway, it has always borne out to be true.
See also: breed, love

hate breeds hate

If you treat someone with anger, malice, or hatred, it will typically cause them to behave in a similar way to yourself or to others. I try to give everyone the benefit of the doubt and treat people as kindly as possible, even if they've wronged me in the past. Hate only ever breeds hate, after all. It just feels like people only want to attack and tear down anyone with an opposing opinion these days. But hate breeds hate, and all we seem to be getting is an ever-rising sea of ill will between each other.
See also: breed, hate

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Prov. People do not respect someone they know well enough to know his or her faults. The movie star doesn't let anyone get to know him, because he knows that familiarity breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

Like breeds like.

Prov. People tend to raise children who are like them; something tends to give rise to things that resemble it. Jill: I think Fred's little boy is going to be just as disagreeable as Fred. Jane: That's no surprise. Like breeds like.
See also: breed, like

familiarity breeds contempt

Long experience of someone or something can make one so aware of the faults as to be scornful. For example, Ten years at the same job and now he hates it-familiarity breeds contempt. The idea is much older, but the first recorded use of this expression was in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee (c. 1386).
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

If you say that familiarity breeds contempt, you mean that if you know someone or something very well, you can easily become bored with them and stop treating them with respect. Of course, it's often true that familiarity breeds contempt, that we're attracted to those who seem so different from those we know at home. It is second-year drivers — when familiarity breeds contempt for road rules — that are the problem. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of contempt. Familiarity breeds inattention. Typically, family members are so convinced they know what another family member is going to say that they don't bother to listen.
See also: breed, contempt

a breed apart

a kind of person or thing that is very different from the norm.
See also: apart, breed

breed like rabbits

reproduce prolifically. informal
See also: breed, like, rabbit

familiarity breeds conˈtempt

(saying) you have little respect, liking, etc. for somebody/something that you know too well: George’s father is regarded by everyone as a great artist, but George doesn’t think he is. Familiarity breeds contempt!
See also: breed, contempt

breed

a scab/scabs on (one's) nose Regional
To stir up trouble for oneself.

breed up a storm

New England
To become cloudy.
See also: breed, storm, up

familiarity breeds contempt

Overexposure to or knowing something or someone too thoroughly can turn liking into hostility. The idea behind this expression dates from ancient times—the Roman writer Publilius Syrus used it about 43 b.c.—and approximately twelve hundred years later Pope Innocent III repeated it, also in Latin. The first record of it in English appeared in Nicholas Udall’s translation of Erasmus’s sayings (1548): “Familiaritye bringeth contempt.” Later writers often stated it with humor or irony, notably Mark Twain in his unpublished diaries (Notebooks, ca. 1900): “Familiarity breeds contempt—and children.”
See also: breed, contempt
References in periodicals archive ?
Local breeds have been largely displaced worldwide by high-yielding breeds.
New Zealand experts will collaborate with Saudi experts on developing a plan to promote livestock breeds in the Kingdom, through modern techniques to correct the traditional practices that have led to lower productivity and higher costs.
The Rare Breeds Show depends upon individuals who are champions for particular breeds that they find meet their needs.
I also read somewhere that the superior and unique taste of traditionally raised farm chickens compared to the fast-growing commercial breeds is in their slow-growing genes, which confer quality attributes such as taste, culinary delicacy, correct texture and flavour.
It (http://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/nederlandse-kooikerhondje/detail/#4) almost went extinct in the 1930s but the breed was saved.
The breed the author forgot to list is the Irish Red and White Setter.
Over time, other dedicated cat fanciers joined the effort to perfect the breed, standardizing the breeding process and solidifying the wild markings juxtaposed by the steady temperament of the domestic cat.
Preserving the breeds of cattle refers specially to preserving the genetic resources of indigenous cattle.
Nei's genetic distance estimates indicated relatively close genetic identity between Tharparker and Red-Sindhi breeds of Sindh Province of Pakistan while Tharparker and Dajal breeds of Pakistan were found most distinct.
Illustrated with full-color photography on almost every other page, Rabbit Breeds is a pocket-sized reference featuring 49 different breeds of rabbit.
Many commercial hatcheries focus only on hybrid chickens and fail to maintain good quality in the heritage breeds they offer.
It found that breeds implicated in serious dog bites included mixes, German Shepherd Dogs, pit-bull types.
HOW did Wales come to have 18 breeds of sheep that are routinely identified as being uniquely Welsh?