breed


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breed like rabbits

slang To have several babies in a short period of time. (Rabbits are known to produce a large number of offspring very rapidly.) I can't believe my sister is pregnant for the fourth time in five years. She and her husband just breed like rabbits!
See also: breed, like, rabbit

familiarity breeds contempt

Repeated exposure to someone or something often creates a contentious relationship. A: "Those two teams have built up quite a rivalry over the years." B: "They play in the same division, and familiarity breeds contempt." I've been stuck with Larry in the office all week, and I'm afraid they're right that familiary breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

a breed apart

A type or group of people that is markedly superior to or unique from most others. Citizens from that state have long considered themselves a breed apart from the rest of the country, and there has been a growing movement to gain secession in recent years. Watching her performance on the field yesterday, it is clearer than ever that the team's captain is truly a breed apart.
See also: apart, breed

breed up a storm

Of the weather, to become overcast. I wouldn't go outside right now—it looks to be breeding up a storm.
See also: breed, storm, up

like breeds like

1. A person will usually adopt similar beliefs, characteristics, or behavior to those they spend the most time with, such as family, friends, colleagues, etc. Well, is it any surprise he's acts way, considering his father's behavior? Like breeds like, after all. Like breeds like, and if you're running a company with questionable ethics, don't be surprised if your employees aren't the most morally upright people in the world.
2. People tend to associate with those who share the same beliefs or behaviors, which in turn reinforces them. Like breeds like when it comes to mainstream political discourse, and this has become even more evident in the age of social media. People don't want to examine their own actions or beliefs with a critical eye, they just want to be surrounded by those who are the same or approve of it. Like breeds like, after all.
See also: breed, like

love breeds love

If you show love, kindness, and goodwill toward someone, it will typically cause them to behave in a similar way to yourself or to others. I feel like we as a people are losing the notion that love breeds love these days, choosing instead to attack or criticize other people as our default reaction. I've always taken the stance that love breeds love, and, in my own experience, anyway, it has always borne out to be true.
See also: breed, love

hate breeds hate

If you treat someone with anger, malice, or hatred, it will typically cause them to behave in a similar way to yourself or to others. I try to give everyone the benefit of the doubt and treat people as kindly as possible, even if they've wronged me in the past. Hate only ever breeds hate, after all. It just feels like people only want to attack and tear down anyone with an opposing opinion these days. But hate breeds hate, and all we seem to be getting is an ever-rising sea of ill will between each other.
See also: breed, hate

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Prov. People do not respect someone they know well enough to know his or her faults. The movie star doesn't let anyone get to know him, because he knows that familiarity breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

Like breeds like.

Prov. People tend to raise children who are like them; something tends to give rise to things that resemble it. Jill: I think Fred's little boy is going to be just as disagreeable as Fred. Jane: That's no surprise. Like breeds like.
See also: breed, like

familiarity breeds contempt

Long experience of someone or something can make one so aware of the faults as to be scornful. For example, Ten years at the same job and now he hates it-familiarity breeds contempt. The idea is much older, but the first recorded use of this expression was in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee (c. 1386).
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

If you say that familiarity breeds contempt, you mean that if you know someone or something very well, you can easily become bored with them and stop treating them with respect. Of course, it's often true that familiarity breeds contempt, that we're attracted to those who seem so different from those we know at home. It is second-year drivers — when familiarity breeds contempt for road rules — that are the problem. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of contempt. Familiarity breeds inattention. Typically, family members are so convinced they know what another family member is going to say that they don't bother to listen.
See also: breed, contempt

a breed apart

a kind of person or thing that is very different from the norm.
See also: apart, breed

breed like rabbits

reproduce prolifically. informal
See also: breed, like, rabbit

familiarity breeds conˈtempt

(saying) you have little respect, liking, etc. for somebody/something that you know too well: George’s father is regarded by everyone as a great artist, but George doesn’t think he is. Familiarity breeds contempt!
See also: breed, contempt

breed

a scab/scabs on (one's) nose Regional
To stir up trouble for oneself.

breed up a storm

New England
To become cloudy.
See also: breed, storm, up

familiarity breeds contempt

Overexposure to or knowing something or someone too thoroughly can turn liking into hostility. The idea behind this expression dates from ancient times—the Roman writer Publilius Syrus used it about 43 b.c.—and approximately twelve hundred years later Pope Innocent III repeated it, also in Latin. The first record of it in English appeared in Nicholas Udall’s translation of Erasmus’s sayings (1548): “Familiaritye bringeth contempt.” Later writers often stated it with humor or irony, notably Mark Twain in his unpublished diaries (Notebooks, ca. 1900): “Familiarity breeds contempt—and children.”
See also: breed, contempt
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Rare breed Barbados Blackbelly sheep are hair sheep.
It is, thus, in the owner's interest to insure the breed will survive by making others aware of these breeds and encouraging those inclined to become owners and breeders.
On the other hand, the colour of the egg yolk depends on feeding hens a diet rich in beta carotene sources of feeds such as green leafy vegetables, alfalfa, yellow maize or sweet potatoes, not the chicken breed.
12 Shih-tzu Developed in China, the breed is known as little lion dog in Mandarin.
The new breeds are a little more difficult to say "shepherd" or "retriever." The Nederlandse Kooikerhondje and the Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen bring the total number of breeds the AKC recognizes to 192, (http://www.akc.org/press-center/press-releases/nederlandse-kooikerhondje-grand-basset-griffon-vendeen-gain-full-american-kennel-club-recognition/) according to a release from the AKC.
You will be happy to hear that a breed feature on the Irish Red and White Setter is scheduled for a 2019 issue.
More than 20 years later, in 1987, the breed finally achieved full championship status by the CFA.
Crossbreeding work was started in India as early as 1875 by the British, near Patna using Shorthorn bull on local cows and the "Taylor" breed of various colours cattle was formed with an average milk yield of 5-6 litres/day.
Blood samples (10 ml) were collected aseptically during extensive travelling to respective breeding areas of each selected cattle breed in all four provinces of Pakistan from phenotypically pure animals.
Breed stereotypes are pervasive and impact local and state breed-specific legislation (BSL), homeowner's insurance rates, rental property regulations, and shelter decisions regarding adoption and euthanasia.
This hardy, dual-purpose North American breed was developed in the 1890s, and it had almost reached extinction when the breeding project began in 2006.
Trainer Jill Kessler-Miller makes the point in the article on dog-bite liability in this issue that the greater the prevalence of a breed in a population, the more it will be represented in dog incidents.
Complicating the picture, however, was the South Wales Welsh breed. Unlike the Improved and Hill Flock Welsh Mountain breeds, it lacked genetic commonality with Scandinavian and southern European breeds, suggesting a distinct ancestry.
In the horse book, for example, the cob, the western horse, and the polo pony are each referred to as a distinct "breed," although the cob is actually an equine body type, the western horse can be any horse shown or ridden in western tack, and a polo pony is any horse or pony used in the game of polo.
FORMER WBO lightheavyweight boxing champion Nathan Cleverly has thrown his weight behind Caerphilly-based Hope Rescue and their campaign to provide free neutering for Bull breed dogs in the CF and NP postcode areas.