breath


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References in classic literature ?
Be that as it might, he fancied that, while Beatrice was gazing at the insect with childish delight, it grew faint and fell at her feet; its bright wings shivered; it was dead--from no cause that he could discern, unless it were the atmosphere of her breath. Again Beatrice crossed herself and sighed heavily as she bent over the dead insect.
Whether or no Beatrice possessed those terrible attributes, that fatal breath, the affinity with those so beautiful and deadly flowers which were indicated by what Giovanni had witnessed, she had at least instilled a fierce and subtle poison into his system.
But Tip had no breath to speak, so the Saw-Horse continued his wild career unchecked and with unabated speed.
"By the breath o' my body!" said Arthur, "that will I do!" and he gripped him gladly by the hand.
"O, man, man!" said Little John as soon as he had got his breath. "Never saw I so fine a sight in all my born days.
'Would you--be good enough,' Alice panted out, after running a little further, 'to stop a minute--just to get--one's breath again?'
Alice had no more breath for talking, so they trotted on in silence, till they came in sight of a great crowd, in the middle of which the Lion and Unicorn were fighting.
Pollyanna paused for breath, and Nancy managed to stammer:
Hooper, and would not yield their breath till he appeared; though ever, as he stooped to whisper consolation, they shuddered at the veiled face so near their own.
Such a gust struck them at the moment when Vasili Andreevich, having recovered his breath, got out of the sledge and went up to Nikita to consult him as to what they should do.
After a hard race of almost an hour, tired and out of breath, Pinocchio finally reached the door of the cottage and knocked.
In one breath she asked hundreds of questions about Mr.
And then she paused for breath. The new-born lamb Dickon had found three days before lying by its dead mother among the gorse bushes on the moor.
He now sat down again very much out of breath, gasping at his pipe as if it contained a supply of that necessary, without which he must perish.
No, he breathes through his spiracle alone; and this is on the top of his head.