break new ground

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break new ground

To innovate. They've really broken new ground with their latest product—I've never seen anything like it.
See also: break, ground, new
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

break new ground

Fig. to begin to do something that no one else has done; to pioneer [in an enterprise]. Dr. Anderson was breaking new ground in cancer research. They were breaking new ground in consumer electronics.
See also: break, ground, new
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

break new ground

COMMON If someone breaks new ground, they make progress by doing something completely different. The programme broke new ground, in giving to women roles traditionally assigned to men. They're trying to break new ground, make a new kind of cinema. Note: You can also use ground-breaking before a noun. He was given an award for his ground-breaking work in the field. She wrote a ground-breaking book on the subject. Note: You use these expressions to show approval.
See also: break, ground, new
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

break new (or fresh) ground

do something innovative which is considered an advance or positive benefit.
Literally, to break new ground is to do preparatory digging or other work prior to building or planting something. In North America the idiom is break ground .
See also: break, ground, new
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

break fresh/new ˈground

make a discovery; use new methods, etc: We’re breaking fresh ground with our new freezing methods. ▶ ˈground-breaking adj.: a ground-breaking discovery/report
See also: break, fresh, ground, new
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

break new ground

To advance beyond previous achievements: broke new ground in the field of computers.
See also: break, ground, new
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
RTE breaks new ground tonight with a controversial insight into the world of terrorist bombers.
To begin with, although those readers familiar with Breazeale's and Ehrenreich's research on Esquire and Playboy's efforts to construct a consumer-happy middle-class masculinity will probably feel considerable deja vu when reading Osgerby's book, Osgerby breaks new ground by demonstrating how dependent these men's magazines were on the college youth market.
In this respect, the book breaks new ground and deals with texts that have gone largely unexamined in Free Will Baptist historiography.
The rezoning breaks new ground by establishing a Waterfront Access Plan (WAP) for the Greenpoint Williamsburg waterfront, developed in consultation with the Brooklyn Community Board 1 zoning task force.
In Enfants Terribles, Weiner breaks new ground by analyzing the French mass media to map out the rise of a new figure in the French cultural landscape, the teenage girl.
This is a meticulously researched and important monograph that breaks new ground on what may appear as familiar terrain.
This move breaks new ground in China by offering local and multinational companies a full range of consultancy and brokerage services and asset services.
But this story is particularly significant because it breaks new ground: Viewers have watched Bianca (played by a number of actresses) since she was born, which makes her the first long-standing character on a soap revealed to be gay.