break ground

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break ground

To start a construction project. The phrase refers to the first excavation of the site, often done with a ceremonial shovel. They broke ground on the new corporate headquarters today, but it will be years before we can actually move into it.
See also: break, ground

break ground (for something)

to start digging the foundation for a building. The president of the company came to break ground for the new building. This was the third building this year for which this company has broken ground. When do they expect to break ground at the new site?
See also: break, ground

break ground

Also, break new ground.
1. Begin digging into the earth for new construction of some kind. For example, When will they break ground for the town hall? This usage alludes to breaking up the land with a plow. [Early 1700s]
2. Take the first steps for a new venture; advance beyond previous achievements. For example, Jeff is breaking new ground in intellectual property law. [Early 1700s]
See also: break, ground

break ground

AMERICAN
1. If someone breaks ground on a new building, they start building it and if a new building breaks ground, it starts to be built. Simpson and Hurt hope to break ground on a planned outdoor theater next August. The first co-housing project in America will break ground soon.
2. If someone breaks ground in a particular activity or area of study, they do something that is different and if something breaks ground, it is different from what came before. Perhaps I am lucky to have been in there at the start, when this music was breaking ground for the first time. We are breaking ground in the law here and have to proceed cautiously.
See also: break, ground

break ground

1. To begin a new construction project.
2. To advance beyond previous achievements.
See also: break, ground

break ground, to

To begin a new project; to be innovative. The term dates from the sixteenth century, when it meant literally to break up land with a plow, and began to be used figuratively by the late seventeenth century, by the poet John Dryden and others. In 1830, when De Quincey described Jeremy Bentham as “one of those who first broke ground as a pioneer . . . in Natural Philosophy,” the expression was well on its way to clichédom.
See also: break
References in periodicals archive ?
Founded in 1990, Breaking Ground opened its first supportive housing shelter at the 652-unit Times Square Hotel in 1992 and now operates 3,500 units throughout the city, with roughly 1,000 more in the work, according to its website.
Breaking Ground has committed to construct 1,000 new affordable units to help New York City's most vulnerable residents over the next five years, including its first housing for low-income families.
"We have reached the 51st floor within a record time of 350 days since breaking ground on August 16th of last year," noted Jean-Pierre Vaganay, chief operating officer of the Jack Parker Corporation.
Opus East anticipates breaking ground on the second building, a 293,800-square-foot facility, by mid-August; and the third, 418,300 SF, will break ground shortly thereafter.
The developer plans to start breaking ground soon and expects to complete the building within 18 months.
Already, developers like SIP Properties are considering breaking ground on speculative Class A projects.
Other projects breaking ground in 1999 included Bear Stearns' new headquarters being constructed on Madison Avenue and the Rock West site being developed for Morgan Stanley Dean Witter.
In an historic moment for Jersey City one that just a few years ago seemed the slightest of possibilities - Hartz Mountain Industries commenced construction on The Colgate Center by breaking ground at 90 Hudson Street on June 16th.
And, while other developer's shovels are now idle, the company is breaking ground or cutting the ribbon on three different new low-and moderate-income residential developments all built in partnership with neighborhood associations.