break with (someone or something)

break with (someone or something)

1. To move away or separate from someone or something. I'm starting to break with the religious tradition I was raised in. I'm from a family of doctors, so I really broke with tradition when I went to art school!
2. To cease communicating with a person or group. Ultimately, she had to break with her family and their dysfunctional ways in order to be healthy.
See also: break
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

break with

1. Separate from, sever relations with. For example, On this issue the prime minister was forced to break with his cabinet. [Late 1500s] Also see break off, def. 2 and 3.
2. Depart from, reject, as in The couple broke with tradition and decided to write their own marriage vows. [Late 1800s]
See also: break
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

break with

v.
1. To discontinue something that has been ongoing or continuous: This year we broke with tradition and did not get a pumpkin for Halloween. The new farming technology has forced the farmers to break with their old methods.
2. To stop communicating with someone, especially because of distance or hostility: The brothers broke with the rest of the family when they moved out of town. I broke with my colleagues for years after our big argument.
See also: break
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also: