break step

break step

1. Literally, to stop walking or marching in unison with others. Come on, Tommy, don't break step! This band formation has to look perfect at the football game on Saturday!
2. By extension, to break from conformity with a larger group or others who one previously agreed with. The eminent scientist broke step with the research team by suggesting an entirely different conclusion about the data.
See also: break, step
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a make or break step, but I've jumped at it."
This incident is the reason the British Army commands that soldiers 'break step' on bridges.
People everywhere wondered whether the French would, in turn, decide to retreat to an illusory past, whether they would break step with the world, exit the stage of history, give in to democratic mistrust and a spirit of division and turn their backs on the Enlightenment, or whether, on the contrary, they would embrace the future, collectively create a new impetus, and reaffirm their faith in the values that have made them a great people.
Finding the skills sets required in a PPP partner are often under estimated and picking the right partners in any PPP is a make or break step on the road to success, stresses de la Torre.
Netanyahu said on Monday it was in Israel's "supreme interest to prevent Iran from arming itself with nuclear weapons." But his government also appears keen not to break step with key ally the United States and other world powers, which are seeking to persuade Tehran to curb the military potential of its nuclear program by means of diplomacy and economic sanctions.
As we approached it, someone at the front of our group shouted out: 'Break Step!'.
The winger did not have to break step in delivering a perfect cross to set up Frank Lampard for West Ham's second.
It is well known in the infantry that we "break step" over a bridge, in case we damage it.