break ground


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break ground

To start a construction project. The phrase refers to the first excavation of the site, often done with a ceremonial shovel. They broke ground on the new corporate headquarters today, but it will be years before we can actually move into it.
See also: break, ground

break ground (for something)

to start digging the foundation for a building. The president of the company came to break ground for the new building. This was the third building this year for which this company has broken ground. When do they expect to break ground at the new site?
See also: break, ground

break ground

Also, break new ground.
1. Begin digging into the earth for new construction of some kind. For example, When will they break ground for the town hall? This usage alludes to breaking up the land with a plow. [Early 1700s]
2. Take the first steps for a new venture; advance beyond previous achievements. For example, Jeff is breaking new ground in intellectual property law. [Early 1700s]
See also: break, ground

break ground

AMERICAN
1. If someone breaks ground on a new building, they start building it and if a new building breaks ground, it starts to be built. Simpson and Hurt hope to break ground on a planned outdoor theater next August. The first co-housing project in America will break ground soon.
2. If someone breaks ground in a particular activity or area of study, they do something that is different and if something breaks ground, it is different from what came before. Perhaps I am lucky to have been in there at the start, when this music was breaking ground for the first time. We are breaking ground in the law here and have to proceed cautiously.
See also: break, ground

break ground

1. To begin a new construction project.
2. To advance beyond previous achievements.
See also: break, ground

break ground, to

To begin a new project; to be innovative. The term dates from the sixteenth century, when it meant literally to break up land with a plow, and began to be used figuratively by the late seventeenth century, by the poet John Dryden and others. In 1830, when De Quincey described Jeremy Bentham as “one of those who first broke ground as a pioneer . . . in Natural Philosophy,” the expression was well on its way to clichédom.
See also: break
References in periodicals archive ?
While declining to reveal when it planned to announce its contracts for the project, it said "we will break ground on infrastructure works and villas in December 2013".
The expansion will break ground in September for an anticipated completion date in spring 2015
The project has recently been cleared to break ground.
In addition, the building overlooks the site of the new MetroStars Stadium in Harrison, which is set to break ground in the second quarter of this year.
However, the company's most ambitious project at the moment is a 12-story condominium building at 447 West 18th Street in Chelsea, for which they plan to break ground in February.
The marketing group's mission is to sell the units as quickly as possible and gear up to sell the developers' next project, also in South Park Slope, which is scheduled to break ground in early 2006.
to break ground for the construction of new artist live/ work condominiums, artist loft rentals and retail space along Main Street.
This spring, Parks & Recreation will break ground on four additional projects totaling nearly $8 million.
Some of its projects in the long-dilapidated city center will break ground shortly.
Westminster Communities expects to break ground on the project in November.