brazen

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brazen (it) out

To face something, especially a difficult situation or an accusation, shamelessly and/or with brash self-confidence. Timmy brazened out his teacher's scolding about misbehaving. I just had to brazen it out when the boss suspected me of mishandling the account.
See also: brazen, out

brazen it out

To act bravely and confidently when one is afraid or uncertain. I'm terrified to give this presentation, but I just have to brazen it out and hope for the best.
See also: brazen, out

brave it out

1. Face danger or a difficult situation with courage. For example, They had far fewer votes than the opposition, but they decided to brave it out. [Late 1500s]
2. Also, brazen it out. Boast or swagger, act with impudent bravado. For example, They hadn't been invited but decided to stay and brazen it out. [Mid-1500s]
See also: brave, out

brazen out

v.
1. To face or endure something boldly: The determined people brazened out the political crisis. Your first month in the army will be tough, but I know you can brazen it out.
2. To face or admit to something shameful or untrue without expressing any remorse or shame: I can't believe that the government would brazen out such a terrible scandal. Instead of admitting that her story was a lie, she brazened it out.
3. To invent some bold story to cover up something that is embarrassing: The angry student brazened out a poor excuse for his bad behavior.
See also: brazen, out

brazen it out, to

To face a difficult situation boldly or impudently. The verb (and adjective) “brazen” both mean “brass” (see also bold as brass). Classical mythology distinguished four ages of mankind—the Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Iron ages (described by Ovid)—and Thomas Heywood, a playwright (1572–1650), termed the third the Brazen Age, a period of war and violence. During the mid-sixteenth century the verb “to brazen” meant to act boldly. The precise modern expression was used by John Arbuthnot (“He would talk saucily, lye, and brazen it out”) in The History of John Bull (1712).
See also: brazen