brave

(redirected from bravest)
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brave new world

An era characterized by a feeling of hope, often due to great societal change. The phrase originated in Shakespeare's The Tempest. Some people think that we live in a brave new world, thanks to so many technological advancements, but I'm skeptical.
See also: brave, new, world

brave out

To courageously endure a difficult, unpleasant, or uncertain situation. A noun or pronoun can be used between "brave" and "out." Although I felt dizzy from smoke inhalation, I managed to brave it out until all the kids were out of the burning building. The coach's sudden death made this a very challenging season, but our players have braved it out admirably.
See also: brave, out

brave the elements

To go out into and endure bad or stormy weather. Usually used hyperbolically. Thank you for braving the elements to come pick me up. I know there's a slight drizzle, but if you can brave the elements, then you may go play outside for a while.
See also: brave, element

fortune favors the brave

Courageous action is often rewarded. The phrase encourages people to take bold actions. I know you're nervous about asking for a raise, but keep in mind that fortune favors the brave—you'll never get anything if you don't ask for it. I decided to ask out the most popular girl in school because fortune favors the brave, right?
See also: brave, favor, fortune

none but the brave deserve the fair

Only those who are courageous and unafraid of failure will find success. It's risky, sure, but the money we stand to make from the move is too good to pass up. Come on, none but the brave deserve the fair!
See also: brave, but, deserve, fair, none

put a brave face on (something)

To appear or make oneself seem more happy, confident, or courageous than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put a brave face on it and stepped out onto the stage to deliver the address. The engineers have been putting a brave face on the problem, but I think this breakdown is going to set us back for months.
See also: brave, face, on, put

put a brave front on

1. To appear or make oneself seem more courageous, resolute, or dauntless than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put a brave front on and stepped out onto the stage to deliver it. This girl I'm dating has a big dog that I'm really scared of, but I'm trying to put a brave front on when it's around.
2. To react to or face difficulties, setbacks, or adversity with high spirits or good cheer. John's been putting a brave front on ever since his wife left him, but I can tell that he is devastated on the inside. I really didn't want to spend Thanksgiving with my wife's parents, but I put a brave front on and suffered through it with a smile.
See also: brave, front, on, put

put on a (brave) front

1. To appear or make oneself seem more courageous, resolute, or dauntless than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put on a brave front and stepped out onto the stage to deliver it. This girl I'm dating has a big dog that I'm really scared of, but I put on a front when it's around.
2. To react to or face difficulties, setbacks, or adversity with high spirits or good cheer. John's been putting on a front since his wife left him, but I can tell that he is devastated on the inside. I really didn't want to spend Thanksgiving with my wife's parents, but I put on a brave front and suffered through it with a smile.
See also: front, on, put

put on a brave face

1. To appear or make oneself seem more courageous, resolute, or dauntless than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put on a brave face and stepped out onto the stage to deliver it. This girl I'm dating has a big dog that I'm really scared of, but I'm trying to put on a brave face when it's around.
2. To react to or face difficulties, setbacks, or adversity with high spirits or good cheer. John's been putting on a brave face since his diagnosis, taking it one day at a time. I really didn't want to spend Thanksgiving with my wife's parents, but I put on a brave face and suffered through it with a smile.
See also: brave, face, on, put

put on a brave front

1. To appear or make oneself seem more courageous, resolute, or dauntless than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put on a brave front and stepped out onto the stage to deliver it. This girl I'm dating has a big dog that I'm really scared of, but I'm trying to put on a brave front when it's around.
2. To react to or face difficulties, setbacks, or adversity with high spirits or good cheer. John's been putting on a brave front ever since his wife left him, but I can tell that he is devastated on the inside. I really didn't want to spend Thanksgiving with my wife's parents, but I put on a brave front and suffered through it with a smile.
See also: brave, front, on, put

put up a (brave) front

1. To appear or make oneself seem more courageous, resolute, or dauntless than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put up a brave front and stepped out onto the stage to deliver it. This girl I'm dating has a big dog that I'm really scared of, but I put up a front when it's around.
2. To react to or face difficulties, setbacks, or adversity with high spirits or good cheer, especially when it is disingenuous or unauthentic. John's been putting up a front since his wife left him, but I can tell that he is devastated on the inside. I really didn't want to spend Thanksgiving with my wife's parents, but I put up a brave front and suffered through it with a smile.
See also: front, put, up

put up a brave front

1. To appear or make oneself seem more courageous, resolute, or dauntless than one really feels. I could feel my knees shaking with terror before my commencement speech, but I put up a brave front and stepped out onto the stage to deliver it. This girl I'm dating has a big dog that I'm really scared of, but I'm trying to put up a brave front when it's around.
2. To react to or face difficulties, setbacks, or adversity with high spirits or good cheer. John's been putting up a brave front since his diagnosis, taking it one day at a time. I really didn't want to spend Thanksgiving with my wife's parents, but I put up a brave front and suffered through it with a smile.
See also: brave, front, put, up

brave something out

to endure something; to put up with something courageously. I don't know if all the men can brave the attack out. The soldiers braved out the attack.
See also: brave, out

Fortune favors the brave.

 and Fortune favors the bold.
Prov. You will have good luck if you carry out your plans boldly. (Used to encourage people to have the courage to carry out their plans.) Fortune favors the bold, Bob. Quit your day job and work on your novel full-time. Jill: Let's wait till next year before trying to start our own business. Jane: No. We'll do it this year. Fortune favors the brave.
See also: brave, favor, fortune

None but the brave deserve the fair.

Prov. Only a courageous and gallant man deserves a beautiful woman.; Only the best deserves the best. Stop making excuses and just call Gina. None but the brave deserve the fair.
See also: brave, but, deserve, fair, none

brave face, put on a

Also, put up a brave front.
1. Face adversity cheerfully. For example, Even though she had been passed over for promotion, she put on a brave face.
2. Try to appear brave even though very frightened. For example, Harry was terrified of animals, but his boss was a dog lover, so he put up a brave front . [Second half of 1800s]
See also: brave, on, put

brave it out

1. Face danger or a difficult situation with courage. For example, They had far fewer votes than the opposition, but they decided to brave it out. [Late 1500s]
2. Also, brazen it out. Boast or swagger, act with impudent bravado. For example, They hadn't been invited but decided to stay and brazen it out. [Mid-1500s]
See also: brave, out

brave the elements

Go out in stormy weather, as in We've just about run out of food; I'll brave the elements and walk to the store. The use of elements for atmospheric agencies dates from the early 16th century but is rare today except in this expression, which is often used hyperbolically.
See also: brave, element

put a brave face on something

or

put a brave front on something

COMMON If you put a brave face on a difficult situation or put a brave front on it, you try not to let anyone see how upset or disappointed you are. Dwight was upset by the news, but he put a brave face on it and wrote a note of congratulations. Note: You can also say that someone puts on a brave face or puts on a brave front. They don't like to see how awful we're feeling. They'd much rather we put on a brave front and pretend nothing has happened. Note: This expression is extremely variable. For example, you can use verbs such as keep, present or maintain instead of put on. You can use good instead of brave, or just talk about a brave face. I suspect he was just trying to put on a good face. There are very few shoppers in Sloane Street, although shopkeepers are keeping up a brave face. Colleagues said that despite his brave face, Mr Hutchinson was deeply hurt at his treatment.
See also: brave, face, on, put, something

brave new world

a new and hopeful period in history resulting from major changes in society.
This phrase comes ultimately from Shakespeare's The Tempest, but is more often used with allusion to Aldous Huxley's ironical use of the phrase as the title of his 1932 novel Brave New World.
See also: brave, new, world

put a brave (or bold or good) face on something

act as if something unpleasant or upsetting is not as bad as it really is.
See also: brave, face, on, put, something

fortune favours the brave

a successful person is often one who is willing to take risks. proverb
See also: brave, favour, fortune

a ˌbrave new ˈworld

(often ironic) a situation or society that changes in a way that is meant to improve people’s lives but is often a source of extra problems: She promises us a brave new world of high salaries and good working conditions after the reforms.This phrase comes from Shakespeare’s play The Tempest. It was later used by Aldous Huxley as the title of his most famous book, which described a vision of the future.
See also: brave, new, world

put a brave ˈface on something

,

put on a brave ˈface

try to appear brave or cheerful or to be managing well in a difficult situation, when in fact you are frightened or unhappy: ‘How’s Mrs O’Brien?’ ‘She’s trying to put a very brave face on things, but you can see that she’s very unhappy.’
See also: brave, face, on, put, something

brave out

v.
To endure something with great courage: The explorers braved out the hot weather and dangerous animals during their journey. It will be a tough game against such strong players, but you should brave it out and play as well as you can.
See also: brave, out

brave new world, a

A bleak and dismal future. The term comes from Shakespeare’s The Tempest, in which Miranda says despairingly, “O brave new world, that has such people in’t” (5.1). British novelist Aldous Huxley borrowed it for the title of his 1932 novel, in which human beings are grown in the laboratory and designed to perform particular jobs in society.
See also: brave, new

brave the elements, to

To go outdoors in bad weather. To face wind and rain with courage today seems rather an overstatement, but this archaic-sounding locution was common in the nineteenth century. “Brave you storm with firm endeavor, let your vain repinings go,” wrote the poet George Cooper (1838–1927).
See also: brave
References in periodicals archive ?
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WITH the aim of introducing tales of valour and unparalleled bravery of the bravest of brave Indian soldiers to the young generation, Union HRD Minister Smriti Irani and Army Chief General Dalbir Singh on Monday inaugurated the first batch of books of five heroes in the Param Vir Chakra series.
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Mackay's great rival, Billy Bremner, who died 18 years ago, was once described as, "ten stone of barbed wire", and George Best once referred to Mackay as, "the hardest man I ever played against, and the bravest".
Often we think it is those on the front line who are the bravest, but Lyndsey and hundreds like her prove every day that it takes heroic courage to face up to loss and to stay strong on the home front as well.