brass

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Related to brasses: horse brasses
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brass

1. noun, slang High-ranking officers or officials, especially in the military. The brass came in and assumed command of the whole operation.
2. noun, informal Bold, brazen, or impudent self-confidence. I can't believe he had the brass to demand a raise, right there in the middle of the meeting!
3. noun, slang Money. Primarily heard in UK. He just flashed a little brass, and the security guard let us through.
4. noun, slang A prostitute. From Cockney rhyming slang, in which "brass" is a shortening of "brass flute," "brass door," "brass dart," or "brass nail," which rhyme with "prostitute," "whore," "tart," and "tail," respectively. Primarily heard in UK. It's no surprise to me that the only woman a scumbag like him can get is a brass.

brassed

Irritated, disgruntled, or exasperated. Primarily heard in UK. John's just a bit brassed with us at the moment, so let's leave him alone.
See also: brass
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

brass

n. high-ranking military or civilian officers. (see also top brass.) We’ll see what the brass has to say first.

brassed

verb
See also: brass
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The earliest horse brasses were handmade by the village brassmaker or blacksmith, hammered and filed into shape.
The last of the large manufacturers of horse brasses stopped making them in 1810, though a few small businesses still made stamped and cast brasses.
With renewed interest in draft horses in recent decades, a few companies began making harnesses again and harness accessories such as horse brasses. Horse brasses can be purchased new, if you know where to look for them, but old ones are getting harder to find.
A close examination of old horse brasses can give a clue as to whether they are quite ancient (made by hand, with firing marks around their edges) or made in a modern mold.