branch out

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branch out

1. To split or move away from something. The subclavian artery branches out from the aorta.
2. To grow out from a tree trunk or limb, as of a tree branch. I'm pretty sure the limb that fell in our yard branched out from your tree.
3. To explore something new; to widen one's interests or scope of expertise. You're a great student, honey, but I would really like for you to branch out and try a sport this year. Paul used to only be interested in still photography, but he's branching out and shooting movies now.
See also: branch, out

branch out (into something)

Fig. to diversify and go into new areas. I have decided to branch out into some new projects. Business was very good, so I decided to branch out.
See also: branch, out

branch out

 (from something)
1. Lit. [for a branch] to grow out of a branch or trunk. (Having to do with plants and trees.) A twig branched out of the main limb and grew straight up. The bush branched out from the base.
2. Fig. to expand away from something; to diversify away from narrower interests. The speaker branched out from her prepared remarks. The topic was very broad, and she was free to branch out.
See also: branch, out

branch out

Separate into subdivisions; strike off in a new direction. For example, Our software business is branching out into more interactive products, or Bill doesn't want to concentrate on just one field; he wants to branch out more. This term alludes to the growth habits of a tree's limbs. [Early 1700s] Also see branch off.
See also: branch, out

branch out

v.
1. To develop or have many branches or tributaries: Once this tree reaches a certain size, it will begin to branch out. The river branches out into a great delta before flowing into the sea.
2. To grow out of a tree trunk or branch: I like to sit on a large limb that branches out from the apple tree.
3. To expand the scope of one's interests or activities into a new area or areas: At first I studied only Latin, but later I branched out and began learning other languages, too.
See also: branch, out
References in periodicals archive ?
From its inception, Branching Out positioned itself as a rival of both Ms.
Branching Out defined itself in relationship to three distinct categories of feminist periodical publishing: as a Canadian version of Ms.
Unlike Branching Out, which sought a larger and more mainstream audience and had the production quality to sit on the newsstand next to Chatelaine, small-scale feminist periodicals tended to have amateur aesthetics; they were often mimeographed and stapled, in the form of a small community newsletter, or printed as tabloid newspapers.
Consequently, because amateurism was a valued position within the field of feminist publishing, Branching Out was often critiqued for not being political enough.
Cognizant of the value of amateurism, Branching Out wanted to achieve newsstand appeal while still being open to a variety of content.
By having newsstand appeal, Branching Out sought to legitimate a more diverse understanding of Canadian women's interests and culture than the traditional image of women portrayed in mainstream women's magazines like Ladies' Home Journal.
Branching Out's location within Canadian publishing and the women's movement is perhaps best described by Canadian non-fiction writer Heather Pringle, who worked on Branching Out as poetry and fiction editor from 1977 to 1980 and is now best-known for her writing on archeology and history, including The Master Plan (2006), The Mummy Congress (2001), and In Search of Ancient North America (1996).