bow to (someone or something)

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bow to (someone or something)

To obey, pledge allegiance, or submit one's will to someone or something, especially in a reverential or servile manner. My allegiance is to my own country; I'll never bow to another government! The autocratic CEO all but makes his employees bow to him.
See also: bow
References in periodicals archive ?
They provide balance to the bow, moving the centre of mass to a point just in front of the handle, removing any tendency for the bow to tip.
Like their new [2] Triax ($1,099), which is as enjoyable a bow to shoot as any the company has ever created.
Even companies that build the finest compounds are adding the old-time bow to their line.
Different cable alignments caused the bow to react differently in his hand.
It is possible for one bow to fit all of the criteria you consider, but more often than not, concessions must be made in the selection process.
This month, we'll cover the last two qualities necessary for a bow to work well in the West: stealth and low mass weight.
I want the bow to have no rotational forces acting upon it while I'm at full draw (in any of the three axes).
Tom's bow-building experience and his own mechanical genius quickly took his Jennings Compound Bow to the top of the bowhunting industry.
I like to spray the shelf with foot powder and shoot the arrow through the bow to see if the fletching hits the shelf.
Essentially, the Quick Draw & Tune Accessory is an onboard drawing board that safely allows you to take the bow to full draw while it's loaded and compressed.
The rubbery grip would not allow the bow to naturally center in our hands.
When I got my hands on an Xtreme, I had the bow set up and shooting bullet holes and bull's-eyes so quickly I felt almost cheated out of the joy of tweaking a bow to shooting perfection.
To accomplish this, zero your bow at 20 yards and then purposely torque your bow to the left while shooting arrows and noting the point of impact; then do that same while torqueing the bow to the right.
What I've learned over the years about traditional bows is what every King's archer knew almost 700 years ago: A proper tune is essential if you want your bow to perform at its maximum potential.
My point is this; the vast majority of the time, bows don't cause misses--we force the bow to miss.