bound to (be or do something)

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bound to (be or do something)

Apt or likely to do something. We all thought that Doug was bound to be an artist, so we were very surprised when he became a trader on Wall Street. A: "Do you think it will rain today?" B: "It hasn't rained for weeks, so it's bound to."
See also: bound

bound to do something

certain to do something; destined to do something. Jill's bound to do a good job. We are bound to tell the truth.
See also: bound
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, uremic toxins that contain an indole ring and HA were primarily bound to site II, another major drug-binding area, which is located in subdomain IIIA of the HSA structure [17].
Measuring the radioactivity indicated the amount of DNA bound to the ATR.
Sickle hemoglobin without oxygen bound to it is stickier than normal, so many of these molecules cluster together in long rods.
Once HN has bound to the target, the structure of the cell prevents a mediator--a drug, for example--from interfering with HN's work setting the infectious stage of development into motion.
Another legitimate view, argues Schatz, is that considering the millions of years, millions of creatures, and millions of transposition events that evolution has had to work with, something like this was bound to happen.
Several of these compounds have been listed by the National Toxicology Program as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen, particularly those PAHs associated with the particulate phase, once they've bound to respirable particles.
Hendrickson of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Columbia University in New York finally created a crystal of the protein bound to two other molecules.
Once bound to DNA, the estrogen/estrogen receptor complex modulates the transcription of target genes (11,12) through which it exerts its effects.
The researchers used a radiation detector to determine how successfully the plant extracts bound to the estrogen receptor.
To understand the interactions that determine the size and shape of an atomic nucleus, it helps to have a detailed picture of the simplest possible combination: a proton bound to a neutron.
To produce their X-ray picture of T7, the investigators created a crystal of the polymerase bound to a DNA fragment whose strands were of different lengths.