bounce (something) back and forth

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bounce (something) back and forth

1. Literally, for two or more people to bounce something, typically a ball, between them. It's nice to see the kids out in the back yard bouncing a ball back and forth.
2. To discuss something. I bounced the idea of becoming an actress back and forth with many people before discussing it with my parents.
3. To consider or change between several options. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is not usually used between "bounce" and "back and forth." No, I haven't settled on a college yet—I'm still bouncing back and forth between a few options.
See also: and, back, bounce, forth

bounce something back and forth

 
1. Lit. to bat, toss, or throw something alternately between two people. (Usually a ball.) The two guys bounced the ball back and forth. John and Timmy bounced it back and forth.
2. Fig. to discuss an idea back and forth among a group of people. Let's bounce these ideas back and forth awhile and see what we come up with. The idea was bounced back and forth for about an hour.
See also: and, back, bounce, forth
References in periodicals archive ?
with The Tennessee Kids bouncing back and forth between harmony and
The most plausible explanation for the high energy is that protons bouncing back and forth between the two stellar winds attain energies of at least 10 trillion electron volts.
Elkins's entrance into dance classes coincided with his entry into the New York City clubs--" bouncing back and forth between Purchase and the world of the clubs," as he puts it.
Also, by bouncing back and forth between the two states, glutathione (and other such compounds) can bring about the easy transfer of atomic groupings from one substance to another.
And if you're beginning to feel like a volleyball, bouncing back and forth with each new headline about cholesterol, don't despair.
Matter and photons were tightly coupled because the photons, relentlessly bouncing back and forth between electrons, couldn't travel freely.
Because the light creates a standing wave by bouncing back and forth as it travels along the waveguide, it follows a circuitous, time-consuming path.
After 3,000 nanoseconds, before the antiprotons can get back to the other end, the entrance-end cap is dropped to -3,000 volts, and the antiprotons are caught in the trap, bouncing back and forth. After some trapping period, which has ranged from 1 millisecond to 10 minutes, the exit-end cap is grounded, and the trapped antiprotons exit to an instrument that counts them.