bouncing


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bounce along

1. Of an object, to move with repeated hops or bounces into the air. The rubber ball bounced along the floor and then rolled into the wall.
2. Of a person, to move with a noticeably cheerful demeanor. He's been bouncing along ever since his crush agreed to go on a date with him.
See also: bounce

bounce around

1. Of an object, to move erratically with repeated hops into the air. The rubber ball bounced around before finally rolling into the wall.
2. Of a person, to move or change between several different things, such as jobs or places. Well, since I graduated from school, I've just been bouncing around, working any job I can get. That player has bounced around a lot in his short career—in three years, he's already been on five teams!
3. To discuss something with other people by mentioning it informally, in passing, or at various times. In this usage, a noun can come between "bounce" and "around." I bounced around the idea of becoming an actress with many people before discussing it with my parents. Hey, let's bounce your idea around the office to see if anyone wants to join our team.
4. To circulate widely. News of my suspension sure bounced around fast—the whole school already knows about it.
See also: around, bounce

bounce back

1. Of an object, to return to its starting point by bouncing. I threw the rubber ball against the wall and caught it when it bounced back to me.
2. Of a person, to recover from a setback. The doctors expect her to bounce back and make a full recovery. Kids are resilient, so I'm sure your daughter will bounce back from that scary incident.
See also: back, bounce

bounce (something) back and forth

1. Literally, for two or more people to bounce something, typically a ball, between them. It's nice to see the kids out in the back yard bouncing a ball back and forth.
2. To discuss something. I bounced the idea of becoming an actress back and forth with many people before discussing it with my parents.
3. To consider or change between several options. In this usage, a noun is not usually used between "bounce" and "back and forth." No, I haven't settled on a college yet—I'm still bouncing back and forth between a few options.
See also: and, back, bounce, forth

bounce out

1. Of an object, to come out of a container or place in a bouncing motion. The ball bounced out of the net.
2. To force someone out of something, such as a particular job or place. Did you hear that the CEO was bounced out by the board of directors?
See also: bounce, out

bounce up and down

To hop up and down. The kids started bouncing up and down when they heard school was closed for the day.
See also: and, bounce, down, up

be bouncing off the walls

To be very active and energetic to the point of hyperactivity. How much sugar did you give the kids? They're bouncing off the walls!
See also: bouncing, off, wall

bounce for (something)

To pay for something expensive, especially as a treat for oneself or someone else. I decided to bounce for the new video game as a reward to myself for doing so well on my exam. Janet is bouncing for a trip to Disney World for her family this summer.
See also: bounce

bounce along

 
1. Lit. to move along bouncing. (As might be done by a ball.) The ball bounced along and finally came to rest. The beach ball sort of bounced along until it came to the water.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move along happily. He was so happy that he just bounced along. He stopped bouncing along when he saw all the work he had to do.
See also: bounce

bounce back

 (from something)
1. Lit. [for something] to rebound; [for something] to return bouncing from where it had been. The ball bounced back from the wall. A rubber ball always bounces back.
2. and bounce back (after something) Fig. [for someone] to recover after a disability, illness, blow, or defeat. (See also rebound from something.) She bounced back from her illness quickly. She bounced back quickly after her illness.
See also: back, bounce

bounce out (of something)

to rebound out of or away from something. The ball bounced out of the corner into my hands. The ball bounced out of the box it had fallen into.
See also: bounce, out

bounce something around (with someone)

to discuss something with a number of people; to move an idea from person to person like a ball. I need to bounce this around with my family. I need to bounce around something with you.
See also: around, bounce

bounce up and down

to spring up and down due to natural elasticity or from being jostled or thrown. The ball bounced up and down for an amazingly long time. I bounced up and down in the back of that truck for almost an hour.
See also: and, bounce, down, up

bounce around

1. Move around from one person or place to another. For example, The staff spent the morning bouncing around ideas to improve sales, or She had been bouncing around from one job to another. This term alludes to a ball bouncing among players. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
2. Treat roughly or unfairly, as in Quit bouncing me around; I won't stand for it. This usage is based on a somewhat earlier meaning of bounce, "to beat up" or "coerce." ] Slang; c. 1970]
See also: around, bounce

bounce back

Recover quickly, as in She had pneumonia, but she bounced back in less than a week. This expression is a metaphor for the rebound of a ball or some elastic material.
See also: back, bounce

be bouncing off the walls

INFORMAL
If someone is bouncing off the walls, they are acting in a very uncontrolled and excited way. After another cup of coffee Holly was bouncing off the walls.
See also: bouncing, off, wall

be ˌbouncing off the ˈwalls

(informal) be so full of energy or so excited that you cannot keep still: He was bouncing off the walls so I told him to go out for a walk.
See also: bouncing, off, wall

bounce around

v.
1. To rebound repeatedly in various directions: The ball landed in my bedroom and bounced around, knocking over a vase on the shelf.
2. To cause something to rebound in various directions: Don't bounce the basketball around in the living room! Let's go outside and bounce around my new rubber ball.
3. To move about energetically or restlessly in various directions: The scared mouse bounced around all over the room. The kids are bouncing around in the back seat of the car.
4. To discuss something with a number of people: I bounced my new idea around at the meeting, and some people gave me some very interesting comments on it.
5. To circulate among a number of people. Used of a name, word, or idea: That rumor has been bouncing around here for years.
See also: around, bounce

bounce back

v.
1. To rebound after striking an object or a surface: I threw the tennis ball at the wall, and it bounced back and hit me on the head.
2. To recover quickly, as from a setback or illness: Although the surgery was difficult, the patient bounced back to good health very quickly.
See also: back, bounce
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies by NASA scientists show that bouncing around on a mini trampoline is 68% more effective than jogging and yet requires less effort!
(Party List, Abante Mindanao), another author of the bill, said Batas Pambansa 22 otherwise known as "An Act Penalizing the Making or Drawing and Issuance of a Check Without Sufficient Funds or Credit" was passed to curb the issuance of bouncing checks.
"Get Britain Bouncing aims to publicise trampolining as a fun and safe activity for all the family and we think this is a great way to highlight how much fun bouncing is."
"We will work very closely with the interior ministry in the fight against bouncing cheques and there will be a zero-tolerance towards abusers," the ministry official said, quoted by Al Eqtisadiya on Wednesday.
The current Guinness World Record for the most people bouncing was set in June 2010 during the Street Performance World Championships in Ireland.
The value of bouncing checks fell to SR 1.07 billion in Q1, 2012 compared to SR 2.49 billion in the same period of 2011, a decrease of 57 percent, the report said.
Bouncing takes its lead from a number of sources, and one of the most important is the military model.
Never mind the swelling; the bouncing and the floating were what stuck with me.
Years ago, the only reference people made to bouncing was in respect of a horse's condition the day after it had won a big race.
So, to make an object invisible, scientists have to keep waves from bouncing off it.
Balls are everywhere, and we all have experienced bouncing them in one way or another.
Indicate the level of vividness/graphicness, using the following as a general guide: Basic: large breasts Graphic: large, voluptuous, bouncing breasts Very graphic: large, voluptuous, bouncing breasts with hard nipples Extremely graphic: large, voluptuous, bouncing breasts with hard nipples covered with glistening sweat and bite marks Does the book contain any violent content?
BOUNCING babies may grow up to be the greatest dancers, new research suggests.
And it feels more like bouncing on a trampoline than jumping on an old, springy mattress.
If it rides up in back, there's excess fabric or you're bouncing around, the bra's too big.