bossyboots

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bossyboots

Someone who is bossy or controlling. Josh is such a bossyboots, always trying to micromanage my every move.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bossy is the co-founder of Mid-America Development Partners and Mid-America Real Estate Corporation, both created in 2001.
Then I saw the headline on the Arkansas Democral-Gazette's front-page report on the first day's witnesses in the trial of our former state treasurer: "Shoffner was fist-slammer, bossy, ex-workers testify."
Yet when a little girl does the same, she risks being branded bossy."
Bossy realize she needed to ask more questions and be open to learning.
The witty takes on hard-to-deal-with personality traits, humanized through alliterative names such as Gertrude Grudge, Bob Bossy, and Larry Lazy.
You love her dearly, but that girl can be so bossy! Here's how to get your friendship back in balance.
Ruth Ohi, the award-winning illustrator of over 40 children's books, has created two new picture books, Clara and the Bossy and The Couch Was a Castle featuring guinea pig characters and aimed at primary aged children.
But, at the same time, it was neither overbearing nor bossy. Perhaps its effect is best described as the bearable lightness of history."
Car bays are defined with blocks of colour rather than the usual bossy lines.
The straight talking Scouser certainly looks the part for her role as a bossy pantomime witch in these floor length scarlet robes.
It was called The Bossy Christmas Fairies and it was magical.
Since he is usually one of the most moderate of those bossy saints telling me how to live my life, I would like to know what he knows about the holy-making nature of going to work that I do not.
In his lectures, collected in this volume, Bossy is aware of Evennett and Hay's contributions and suggests, like them, a new perspective for studies on post-Reformation Europe.
Following Bossy, he argues that the resulting system suited the kin-based society of that period, and especially its elite, by ensuring that feuds between kin groups would not be disturbed by the inconven ient ritual requirement of a peaceable gathering for mass each Sunday.