borscht belt

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borscht belt

The resort area of the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York once predominately patronized by American Jews. Borscht is a type of soup that originated in Eastern Europe. A lot of Jewish comedians got their start playing the Borscht Belt in upstate New York.
See also: belt
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, Borscht Belt Bungalows has sliced through my personal hotel-centered perspective.
The recreation and culture of American Jews cannot be understood without a knowledge of how they summered for generations in the Catskills, and Borscht Belt Bungalows fills in an important chunk of that history.
Although it is unclear who invented it, the term Borscht Belt became ubiquitous shorthand for the Catskills Jewish hotels.
A highlight of a stay in the Borscht Belt was the nightly entertainment.
The resident buffoons spawned their own trademark brand of self-deprecating yet pointed jokes, which is sometimes referred to as Borscht Belt humor.
With fresh beet juice as the foundation, borscht could include meat, cabbage, onions, parsnips, turnips, carrots and eventually potatoes.
Borscht achieved full-fledged iconic status in America during the 20th century with the rise of the Borscht Belt (see page 20), the term used to refer to the Jewish resorts in the Catskill Mountains where numerous stage and film actors got their start.
We would bring the borscht from the plant and have a dairy lunch of comfort food--borscht and sour cream with a boiled potato and mackerel.
It has survived -- and thrived -- through the "demise of the Borscht Belt" by offering the orthodox Jewish vacationer a first class vacation at a truly amazing value.
Those soups, by the way, include a fulfilling bowl of beet and cabbage borscht ($4.
Are you sure you want to go back to the Rust Belt or the Snow Belt or the Bible Belt or the Borscht Belt?
Homey Russian-style and other Eastern European food featuring hearty borscht and chicken soup, goulash, kebabs and fresh-baked desserts.
She learned to love fresh Russian bread and Borscht while missing out on the American snack luxuries like Pop Tarts and Fruit Roll-Ups.
Borscht a la Russe ($7) comes forth thick and flavorful, dominant with cabbage and potato, garnished provocatively with duck toast and creme fraiche.
Recommended items: Channel Island fish soup, artichoke bisque, borscht, forest mushroom and walnut tart, ballotine of gravlax, formed salads of lobster and poached leek or lobster and cucumber, New York steak, roasted whole poussin, fresh skate wing, herb-marinated Australian rack of lamb, Napoleon pyramid, warm apple crisp, Caraibe chocolate tart.