borrow

(redirected from borrower)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

beg, borrow, or steal

To acquire or accomplish something by any means necessary or available. I don't care if you have to beg, borrow, or steal to get it, I want that car and I want it now! I'm in such a jam, I can't even beg, borrow, or steal the money I need to pay my rent this month.
See also: steal

borrowed time

An uncertain length of time that may end soon or suddenly, bringing any activity, situation, or fortunes associated with it to an end as well. Usually refers to the final period of one's life, in the form "living on borrowed time." In the scope of the planet's history, human existence is a tiny blip and unlikely to last forever—just borrowed time, really. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all living on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, time

exist on borrowed time

To live or exist in a temporary and/or tenuous position, which may come to an end suddenly and abruptly. The small aboriginal population has been existing on borrowed time since the invaders began colonizing their land. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all existing on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, exist, on, time

borrow from (someone or something)

1. Literally, to use something that belongs to another person, with the intent to return it later. A noun can be used between "borrow" and "from." Because I found a date to the dance at the last minute, I just borrowed a dress and shoes from my sister. I ran out of art supplies so I had to start borrowing from Steve.
2. Of a work of some kind, to use elements from something else. That movie may be a comedy, but its plot borrows from crime films of the 1940s.
See also: borrow

borrow trouble

To do something that is unnecessary and likely to cause problems later. That kid isn't bullying you, so if you tattle on him to the teacher, you're definitely borrowing trouble.
See also: borrow, trouble

on borrowed time

In a temporary and/or tenuous position, which will likely come to an end suddenly and abruptly. The company has been on borrowed time ever since those risky investments in 2007 went sour. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all existing on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, on, time

live on borrowed time

To live or exist in a temporary and/or tenuous position, which may come to an end suddenly and abruptly. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all living on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, live, on, time

be living on borrowed time

To be living or existing in a temporary and/or tenuous position, which may come to an end suddenly and abruptly. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all living on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, living, on, time

borrowed plumes

A showy display that is not truly one's own. I know you lied to me earlier, so quit adorning yourself with borrowed plumes and tell me what you really contributed to this event.
See also: borrow, plume

borrow something

Euph. to steal something. The bank robber borrowed a car to drive out of state. I discovered that my office mate had been borrowing money out of my wallet when I wasn't looking.

borrow something from someone

to request and receive the use of something from someone. Can I borrow a hammer from you? Sorry, this hammer was borrowed from my father.
See also: borrow

borrow trouble

Fig. to worry needlessly; to make trouble for oneself. Worrying too much about death is just borrowing trouble. Do not get involved with politics. That's borrowing trouble.
See also: borrow, trouble

live on borrowed time

Fig. to exist only because of good fortune; to live on when death was expected. The doctors told him he was living on borrowed time. You are living on borrowed time, so make the best of it.
See also: borrow, live, on, time

beg, borrow, or steal

Obtain by any possible means, as in You couldn't beg, borrow, or steal tickets to the Olympics. This term is often used in the negative, to describe something that cannot be obtained; Chaucer used it in The Tale of the Man of Law. [Late 1300s]
See also: steal

borrow trouble

Go out of one's way to do something that may be harmful, as in Just sign the will-telling her about it ahead of time is borrowing trouble. [Mid-1800s] Also see ask for, def. 2.
See also: borrow, trouble

on borrowed time, live

Outlive reasonable expectations, as in Our twenty-year-old car is living on borrowed time, or The vet said our dog is living on borrowed time. This expression alludes to time borrowed from death. [Late 1800s]
See also: borrow, live, on

be living on borrowed time

or

be on borrowed time

COMMON If someone or something is living on borrowed time or is on borrowed time, they are not expected to survive for much longer. The organization is living on borrowed time. Its state funding runs out in June of this year, and beyond that, the future is in doubt. From this moment onwards, this government is on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, living, on, time

borrow trouble

take needless action that may have bad effects. North American
See also: borrow, trouble

living on borrowed time

continuing to survive against expectations (used with the implication that this will not be for much longer).
See also: borrow, living, on, time

borrowed plumes

a pretentious display not rightly your own.
This phrase refers to the fable of the jay which dressed itself in the peacock's feathers.
See also: borrow, plume

ˌbeg, ˌborrow or ˈsteal

(also ˌbeg, ˌsteal or ˈborrow) obtain something any way you can: We’ll have to beg, steal or borrow enough money to pay the fines.
See also: borrow, steal

be/live on borrowed ˈtime


1 (of a person who is seriously ill) live longer than the doctors expected: The doctors say he’s living on borrowed time.
2 be doing something that other people are likely to soon stop you from doing: The government is on borrowed time (= they are not likely to be in power for long).
See also: borrow, live, on, time

borrow trouble

To take an unnecessary action that will probably engender adverse effects.
See also: borrow, trouble

beg, borrow, or steal

Obtain in any possible way. This saying appears in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (The Tale of the Man of Law, ca. 1386): “Maugre [despite] thyn heed, thou most for indigence or stele, or begge, or borwe [borrow] thy despence [expenditure]!” In slightly different form it appears in a seventeenth-century poem with a cautionary moral that is quoted by Washington Irving (“But to beg or to borrow, or get a man’s own, ’tis the very worst world that ever was known”). Almost the same wording appeared in Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanack (1742).
See also: steal

borrowed time, on

An unexpected extension of time. It often refers to someone terminally ill or in great danger but surviving longer than was anticipated, on time that is in effect borrowed from Death. The term dates from the late 1800s. Raymond Chandler used it in The Big Sleep (1930): “Brody was living on borrowed time.” James Patterson also had it, referring to the 48-hour deadline for a threatened bombing attack: “We were definitely operating on borrowed time” (London Bridges, 2004).
See also: borrow, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Borrowers can also pay off their loans in a shorter amount of time at a lower interest rate, said Bhambri.
Another carveout typically included in non-recourse loans relates to liability for material misrepresentation or fraud on the part of the borrower.
Even with President Obama's initiatives to promote credit for small businesses, borrowers are still at the mercy of the banks from which they must borrow.
Education Department's Office of Postsecondary Education has proposed rules to comply with the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007, including defining when borrowers qualify for deferments.
(a) financial covenant relief to allow the borrower time to execute an operational turnaround;
The Trump Administration has done everything they can to muzzle the nations top student loan watchdog at the consumer protection agency, and student borrowers have literally paid the priceits time to fight back.
Currently, the federal student loan program offers several different repayment plans, runs multiple and overlapping loan forgiveness programs, and provides numerous opportunities for borrowers to avoid paying their loans.
In sum, it shows everything the borrower needs to know to make the best choice.
The borrower (or the borrower's commercial mortgage broker) should prepare a professional loan submission package to submit to the lender.
Figure 6 illustrates the relationship between the amount of debt a borrower has accrued and his or her earnings.
Getting all the required information to process a borrower-initiated request is critical, and this is usually where there is a major bust in communications between the borrower and servicer.
"For those who wish to resort to the courts, documents and templates will be posted on every associations' websites, which will help borrowers file their own court cases against banks and co-ops, or defend themselves in court," Melas said.
According to the firm, the minor decrease in the Borrower Health Score suggests that there is now a wider pool of mortgage seekers as home prices improve and credit guidelines ease.
"USA Funds Borrower Connect makes it so easy to identify delinquent borrowers and immediately contact them to discuss deferring or setting up a repayment plan," Riling says.
M2 EQUITYBITES-October 31, 2013--LendingTree issues Borrower Health Report(C)2013 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com