borrow

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Related to borrowed: Borrowed Money

beg, borrow, or steal

To acquire or accomplish something by any means necessary or available. I don't care if you have to beg, borrow, or steal to get it, I want that car and I want it now! I'm in such a jam, I can't even beg, borrow, or steal the money I need to pay my rent this month.
See also: steal

borrowed time

An uncertain length of time that may end soon or suddenly, bringing any activity, situation, or fortunes associated with it to an end as well. Usually refers to the final period of one's life, in the form "living on borrowed time." In the scope of the planet's history, human existence is a tiny blip and unlikely to last forever—just borrowed time, really. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all living on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, time

exist on borrowed time

To live or exist in a temporary and/or tenuous position, which may come to an end suddenly and abruptly. The small aboriginal population has been existing on borrowed time since the invaders began colonizing their land. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all existing on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, exist, on, time

borrow from (someone or something)

1. Literally, to use something that belongs to another person, with the intent to return it later. A noun can be used between "borrow" and "from." Because I found a date to the dance at the last minute, I just borrowed a dress and shoes from my sister. I ran out of art supplies so I had to start borrowing from Steve.
2. Of a work of some kind, to use elements from something else. That movie may be a comedy, but its plot borrows from crime films of the 1940s.
See also: borrow

borrow trouble

To do something that is unnecessary and likely to cause problems later. That kid isn't bullying you, so if you tattle on him to the teacher, you're definitely borrowing trouble.
See also: borrow, trouble

on borrowed time

In a temporary and/or tenuous position, which will likely come to an end suddenly and abruptly. The company has been on borrowed time ever since those risky investments in 2007 went sour. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all existing on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, on, time

live on borrowed time

To live or exist in a temporary and/or tenuous position, which may come to an end suddenly and abruptly. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all living on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, live, on, time

be living on borrowed time

To be living or existing in a temporary and/or tenuous position, which may come to an end suddenly and abruptly. Accidents and disease can strike so unexpectedly that it feels like we're all living on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, living, on, time

borrowed plumes

A showy display that is not truly one's own. Oh, I know you lied to me earlier, so quit adorning yourself with borrowed plumes and tell me what you really contributed to this event.
See also: borrow, plume

borrow something

Euph. to steal something. The bank robber borrowed a car to drive out of state. I discovered that my office mate had been borrowing money out of my wallet when I wasn't looking.

borrow something from someone

to request and receive the use of something from someone. Can I borrow a hammer from you? Sorry, this hammer was borrowed from my father.
See also: borrow

borrow trouble

Fig. to worry needlessly; to make trouble for oneself. Worrying too much about death is just borrowing trouble. Do not get involved with politics. That's borrowing trouble.
See also: borrow, trouble

live on borrowed time

Fig. to exist only because of good fortune; to live on when death was expected. The doctors told him he was living on borrowed time. You are living on borrowed time, so make the best of it.
See also: borrow, live, on, time

beg, borrow, or steal

Obtain by any possible means, as in You couldn't beg, borrow, or steal tickets to the Olympics. This term is often used in the negative, to describe something that cannot be obtained; Chaucer used it in The Tale of the Man of Law. [Late 1300s]
See also: steal

borrow trouble

Go out of one's way to do something that may be harmful, as in Just sign the will-telling her about it ahead of time is borrowing trouble. [Mid-1800s] Also see ask for, def. 2.
See also: borrow, trouble

on borrowed time, live

Outlive reasonable expectations, as in Our twenty-year-old car is living on borrowed time, or The vet said our dog is living on borrowed time. This expression alludes to time borrowed from death. [Late 1800s]
See also: borrow, live, on

be living on borrowed time

or

be on borrowed time

COMMON If someone or something is living on borrowed time or is on borrowed time, they are not expected to survive for much longer. The organization is living on borrowed time. Its state funding runs out in June of this year, and beyond that, the future is in doubt. From this moment onwards, this government is on borrowed time.
See also: borrow, living, on, time

borrow trouble

take needless action that may have bad effects. North American
See also: borrow, trouble

living on borrowed time

continuing to survive against expectations (used with the implication that this will not be for much longer).
See also: borrow, living, on, time

borrowed plumes

a pretentious display not rightly your own.
This phrase refers to the fable of the jay which dressed itself in the peacock's feathers.
See also: borrow, plume

ˌbeg, ˌborrow or ˈsteal

(also ˌbeg, ˌsteal or ˈborrow) obtain something any way you can: We’ll have to beg, steal or borrow enough money to pay the fines.
See also: borrow, steal

be/live on borrowed ˈtime


1 (of a person who is seriously ill) live longer than the doctors expected: The doctors say he’s living on borrowed time.
2 be doing something that other people are likely to soon stop you from doing: The government is on borrowed time (= they are not likely to be in power for long).
See also: borrow, live, on, time

borrow trouble

To take an unnecessary action that will probably engender adverse effects.
See also: borrow, trouble
References in periodicals archive ?
However, its preliminary list shows that the most borrowed author at Irish libraries last year was US crime writer James Patterson who is best known for his books featuring criminal psychologist Alex Cross.
borrowed just $1,000 (believed to be the smallest amount borrowed) in October 2008 and repaid the loan the next day (Source: NYTimes)
Further, both the Congressional Record and the sole revenue ruling on point illustrate the provision with examples in which the taxpayer uses the actual borrowed funds to acquire the stock.
Six of the graduates indicated that they would have borrowed more than they did.
1982], Dutkowsky [1984], Dutkowsky and Foote [1988], and Peristiani [1991] provide ample empirical evidence of structural shift and nonlinearity in the relationship of borrowed reserves to the spread between the federal funds rate and the discount rate.
The reluctance has, however, complicated somewhat the construction of short-term conditional forecasts of borrowed reserves, and it has also reduced the effectiveness of the discount window as a pressure release valve in the reserve market.
Panel C displays the scatter diagram for the borrowed reserves target period with contemporaneous reserve accounting in force.
The measurement of assets at tax cost, however, has no relationship to the need or use of borrowed money by the taxpayer.
The districts are borrowing from 6%-72% of their expected tax levy through the two note issues, with the higher amounts borrowed by the largest districts.
The private sector borrowed double than last year from banks which is significant for growth of economy.
The rules for determining how much can be borrowed are complicated and use a formula that takes into account other loans taken, accrued benefit under the plan and other factors.
Mechanical engineering students, on the other hand, borrowed relatively little - $11,749 on average - while earning an average of $46,182 three years after graduation.
IFA Promotion said the 'savings brake' was now at its highest level since 1990 when people borrowed pounds 1.
Corporations began placing their own instruments on the market and borrowed less from banks; banks chased high-yield loans and increased the range of services offered to increase profit; junk-bond financing provided an easy path to cash; restructuring was a greater source of wealth than business growth; and the voodoo economic gospel of supply-side debt gave no heed to the cost of debt.